Oct 182009
 

Allegheny River Campground

www.alleghenyrivercampground.com

Owners: Rick & Carolyn Wise

1737 Rt 6 W

Roulette PA 16746 US 814-544-8844 EM info@alleghenyrivercampground.com

Facilities Along Route 6 in Potter County, Pennsylvania on the Allegheny River, our location offers convenient access to many local attractions.

Family owned and operated. We want your stay to Allegheny River Campground to be a fun and memorable experience for the whole family.

Open April-Dec

From primitive tent camping, to full 50-amp sewer hookups, to loft cabins. For a weekend stopover, a week-long vacation destination, or a seasonal retreat – we can accommodate you style of camping.

Twenty-eight Roaming Acres on River’s Edge.

Meadow and Shaded Sites.

Forrest & Jeri Bone

Tin Can Tourists

Winter Address:

4 High Street, Bradenton, Florida 34208

 Posted by at 3:51 pm
Oct 102009
 

Koreshan Unity Settlement Gathering – November 5-8, 2009 – Estero Florida – Registration material will be available in the spring and summer editions of Tin Can Tales. Questions?? – call 941-748-1483 or email at f23bone@earthlink.net

Map to the state park:
http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&hl=en&geocode=&q=Koreshan+State+Park,+Estero,+Florida&ie=UTF8&ll=26.448597,-81.81982&spn=0.099748,0.101967&t=h&z=13&iwloc=E

We will have 20 sites in the historic settlement with water and electric hook-ups.

There is a restroom facility and we will have the port-o-lets in early for the event. Showers are located in the campground a short distance away.

Please work through Forrest for reservations to this show. Only selected vintage rigs will park in the Koreshan Unity Settlement, others will have the opportunity to go throughwww.reserveamerica.com to obtain regular campsites for the show.

There are only a three sites available for the show.
At one time I didn’t think we could fill up 20 sites at a Florida event because of our limited membership numbers in the state. But that is no longer the situation. We need three more to complete the show.

Show Poster:
http://www.tincantourists.com/VintageRVShowposter.pdf

 Posted by at 6:23 pm
Oct 102009
 

The Board of Directors is once allowing Jeri and I to handle the initial rental of site three at Braden Castle Park, Bradenton, Florida.
The park was founded in 1924 by the Camping Tourists of America, a group of TCT members.

Some material regarding the park and the site are attached.
If you are interested in a week or two stay at Braden Castle, send in your preferred dates and we will see if things can be worked out.

Pictures and details of the site and park:
http://www.tincantourists.com/BCPsite3.pdf

Forrest & Jeri Bone
Tin Can Tourists
Winter Address::
4 High Street, Bradenton, Florida 34208

 Posted by at 6:15 pm
Oct 082009
 

TCT member, Ken Faber, makes a significant donation to the RV Heritage Museum.

Details below:

Press Release

For Immediate Release

Contact: Al Hesselbart

800-378-8694

Owner Ken Faber, photo courtesy Rich Luhr (Airstream Life editor) taken 2005 WBCCI Int'l Rally.

RV/MH Hall of Fame Receives Rare Airstream Trailer

The RV/MH Hall of Fame museum has received an extremely rare Airstream trailer for exhibit. Now on display at the museum in Elkhart, Indiana, is the 1958, 10 foot long Airstream der Kleiner Prinz (Little Prince) made as a prototype, personally named by Airstream founder Wally Byam and the only one of its size ever produced.

A gift from the collection of Kenneth M. Faber, an avid vintage RV collector and restorer, the unit is in immaculate condition and demonstrates the variety of trailers made by Airstream through the years. Airstream is the oldest name in RVs today and is a part of the Thor Industries family of RV companies.

The RV/MH Hall of Fame in Elkhart honors pioneers of the RV and manufactured housing industries with induction into the hall of fame and displays vintage units from both industries in the related museum. The RV/MH Library contains nearly 20,000 volumes of books, periodicals and sales brochures and nearly 5,000 photographic images.

RV/MH Hall of Fame

21565 Executive Parkway

Elkhart, IN 46514

574.293.2344

Some background info:

RV Life Magazine – Smallest Airstream Ever Made
Written by Douglas Keister
Friday, 01 September 2006 04:00
Most people are familiar with the distinctive shape of the Airstream trailer. These
streamlined vessels always get attention whenever they are seen gliding down the
road. Except for a couple years in the early 1980s when the manufacturer decided
to change the shape (the failure of the “squarestream,” as it was called by its
detractors, nearly put the company out of business), the trailer has retained its
aerodynamic shape from the mid-1930s to the present day. In the world of vintage
Airstream trailers (and contrary to almost everything else in the world) the smaller
the trailer, the more it costs. The diminutive 16-foot long Bambi demands a far
higher price than its bulkier cousins and units smaller than the Bambi like the
Cruisette and the Wee Wind command even higher prices.
Most vintage Airstream aficionados have long believed that the smallest Airstream
ever made was the Cruisette, which measured just under 15 feet. The Cruisette
was manufactured in 1951 and 1952 in Airstream’s California facility and was
marketed as a weekend getaway trailer. Since it had little insulation and no
refrigerator or bathroom, it was little more than an aluminum tent on wheels. The
no-frills package may have contributed to its less than stellar sales (estimates are
that less than 1,000 were made). Nowadays, because of its rarity, it commands a
hefty price.
Littlest Discovery
The Cruisette owned the crown as the tidiest Airstream until September
2004, when Airstream collector Ken Faber of Wyoming, Michigan, rolled up to the
Tin Can Tourists rally in Camp Dearborn, Michigan, with a tiny silver trailer in tow.
As Ken made his way to the registration area, the campground looked like a
scene from the Pied Piper as dozens of rally attendees walked behind the trailer
trying to get a better look. When Ken finally parked and got out of his car, he told
the audience the tale of Der Kleine Prinz, which at 13 feet is the smallest
Airstream ever made.
Faber said that although the provenance of the trailer can’t be absolutely verified
(there are no pictures of its manufacture or an original bill-of-sale), it is clear that
Airstream built the trailer in 1958 at its Jackson Center, Ohio, facility. Bob
Ambrose, a retired Airstream employee, thinks the trailer was built at the request
of Airstream founder Wally Byam after Byam returned from an Airstream caravan
in Europe. The European connection may explain the trailer’s German name Der
Kleine Prinz (the little prince).
It’s unclear what happened to the tiny trailer in the 1960s, but in the 1970s it was
1 / 2
RV Life Magazine – Smallest Airstream Ever Made
Written by Douglas Keister
Friday, 01 September 2006 04:00
discovered on a used car lot and purchased for $800 by a couple from Muncie,
Indiana. A few years later the couple got $1,500 in trade-in value for the Prinz
toward another Airstream product, an Argosy Minuet. Thereafter, Der Kleine Prinz
sat in the Berning’s Trailer Sales showroom in Fort Wayne, Indiana, as an
attention-getting conversation piece. Acting on a tip from a friend, Ken Faber first
saw the trailer in 1992, but it took 12 years of persistence before he finally
convinced Rick Berning, the company’s owner, to sell it to him.
Far from Ordinary
Unique features of the trailer are the Lilliputian bathroom with shower that
Airstream managed to wedge into the left rear corner, a three-burner stove,
refrigerator, propane-fired heater and perhaps the most unique of all, a Der Kleine
Prinz nameplate. The nameplate is particularly noteworthy because at the time of
its manufacture in 1958, Airstream did not routinely put nameplates on its custom
trailers, more evidence that it was probably Byam who commissioned the trailer.
The actual box of the trailer is 6 feet by 10 feet with a 6-foot, 3-inch ceiling. The
tidy proportions make sleeping a bit of a challenge for the 6-foot, 3-inch Faber and
his wife, Petey. (Ken sleeps cross-wise on the floor and Petey sleeps on the bed).
But in reality, the Fabers see themselves more as guardians of Der Kleine Prinz
and rarely use it for camping since they also own a 1948 Wee Wind, 1963 Bambi,
1964 Bambi II, two 1964 Globe Trotters and a 1938 Hayes trailer.
Faber says he has received offers to buy the trailer from as far away as Japan.
But after waiting for over a decade to finally snag the little trailer, he’s not going to
let go of it anytime soon.
- – - – - – -
Douglas Keister’s new book, Mobile Mansions: Taking “Home Sweet Home” on
the Road, was published by Gibbs Smith Publishers in May. Doug is also the
author of Ready to Roll: A Celebration of the Classic American Travel Trailer and
Silver Palaces: America’s Streamline Trailers. Personalized autographed copies
are available from Doug. You can reach him at doug@keisterphoto.com
2 / 2

RV Life Magazine – Smallest Airstream Ever Made

Written by Douglas Keister

Friday, 01 September 2006 04:00

Most people are familiar with the distinctive shape of the Airstream trailer. These streamlined vessels always get attention whenever they are seen gliding down the road. Except for a couple years in the early 1980s when the manufacturer decided to change the shape (the failure of the “squarestream,” as it was called by its detractors, nearly put the company out of business), the trailer has retained its aerodynamic shape from the mid-1930s to the present day. In the world of vintage Airstream trailers (and contrary to almost everything else in the world) the smaller the trailer, the more it costs. The diminutive 16-foot long Bambi demands a far higher price than its bulkier cousins and units smaller than the Bambi like the Cruisette and the Wee Wind command even higher prices.

Most vintage Airstream aficionados have long believed that the smallest Airstream ever made was the Cruisette, which measured just under 15 feet. The Cruisette was manufactured in 1951 and 1952 in Airstream’s California facility and was marketed as a weekend getaway trailer. Since it had little insulation and no refrigerator or bathroom, it was little more than an aluminum tent on wheels. The no-frills package may have contributed to its less than stellar sales (estimates are that less than 1,000 were made). Nowadays, because of its rarity, it commands a hefty price.

Littlest Discovery

The Cruisette owned the crown as the tidiest Airstream until September 2004, when Airstream collector Ken Faber of Wyoming, Michigan, rolled up to the Tin Can Tourists rally in Camp Dearborn, Michigan, with a tiny silver trailer in tow. As Ken made his way to the registration area, the campground looked like a scene from the Pied Piper as dozens of rally attendees walked behind the trailer trying to get a better look. When Ken finally parked and got out of his car, he told the audience the tale of Der Kleine Prinz, which at 13 feet is the smallest Airstream ever made.

Faber said that although the provenance of the trailer can’t be absolutely verified (there are no pictures of its manufacture or an original bill-of-sale), it is clear that Airstream built the trailer in 1958 at its Jackson Center, Ohio, facility. Bob Ambrose, a retired Airstream employee, thinks the trailer was built at the request of Airstream founder Wally Byam after Byam returned from an Airstream caravan in Europe. The European connection may explain the trailer’s German name Der Kleine Prinz (the little prince).

It’s unclear what happened to the tiny trailer in the 1960s, but in the 1970s it was discovered on a used car lot and purchased for $800 by a couple from Muncie, Indiana. A few years later the couple got $1,500 in trade-in value for the Prinz toward another Airstream product, an Argosy Minuet. Thereafter, Der Kleine Prinz sat in the Berning’s Trailer Sales showroom in Fort Wayne, Indiana, as an attention-getting conversation piece. Acting on a tip from a friend, Ken Faber first saw the trailer in 1992, but it took 12 years of persistence before he finally convinced Rick Berning, the company’s owner, to sell it to him.

Far from Ordinary

Unique features of the trailer are the Lilliputian bathroom with shower that Airstream managed to wedge into the left rear corner, a three-burner stove, refrigerator, propane-fired heater and perhaps the most unique of all, a Der Kleine Prinz nameplate. The nameplate is particularly noteworthy because at the time of its manufacture in 1958, Airstream did not routinely put nameplates on its custom trailers, more evidence that it was probably Byam who commissioned the trailer.

The actual box of the trailer is 6 feet by 10 feet with a 6-foot, 3-inch ceiling. The tidy proportions make sleeping a bit of a challenge for the 6-foot, 3-inch Faber and his wife, Petey. (Ken sleeps cross-wise on the floor and Petey sleeps on the bed).

But in reality, the Fabers see themselves more as guardians of Der Kleine Prinz and rarely use it for camping since they also own a 1948 Wee Wind, 1963 Bambi, 1964 Bambi II, two 1964 Globe Trotters and a 1938 Hayes trailer.

Faber says he has received offers to buy the trailer from as far away as Japan.

But after waiting for over a decade to finally snag the little trailer, he’s not going to let go of it anytime soon.

- – - – - – -

Douglas Keister’s new book, Mobile Mansions: Taking “Home Sweet Home” on the Road, was published by Gibbs Smith Publishers in May. Doug is also the author of Ready to Roll: A Celebration of the Classic American Travel Trailer and Silver Palaces: America’s Streamline Trailers. Personalized autographed copies are available from Doug. You can reach him at doug@keisterphoto.com

 Posted by at 8:41 am