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Dec 122014
 

Bradenton resident will be a presenter at the Assembly’s Annual Gathering – January 22-25, 2015

Faculty:
Program:
  • Bone, Forrest

    Forrest Bone

    Dearborn, MI
    Forrest Bone is a retired teacher and coach from Dearborn, Michigan. Forrest and his wife, Jeri, renewed the Tin Can Tourists as an all make and model vintage trailer and motor coach club in 1998. Twenty-one rigs attended the May Renewal Gathering at Camp Dearborn, Milford Michigan. By the end of the year, fifty members were accepted as charter members. The group has grown steadily, currently holding Annual Gatherings in Michigan, Florida, and regional rallies at various locations in the US. Recently Regional Representatives have been added to represent England, Japan, France and Australia. The new version of Tin Can Tourists is open to all. Its goal is to abide by the original group’s objectives and guiding principles as well as the promotion and preservation of vintage trailers and motor coaches through Gatherings and information exchange. With the help of Terry Bone, son and webmaster, the Tin Can Tourists Club has grown steadily. Tin Can Tourists has over 18,000 followers on Facebook, and our website www.tincantourists.com is a great resource for all things related to vintage trailering and Tin Can Tourists.

 Posted by at 4:01 pm
Nov 142014
 

Names and location

My name is Randy Cummins. I live with my wife, Melanie, and our two children, Ava and Aiden. We live in Alpine, Utah.

Trailer and tow vehicles

random shot at gas stationElvis and Prescilla2Priscilla and Elvis...on the road againElvis and Prescilla
The trailer is a 1958 Shasta Airflyte. It came with a refrigerator, water tank, Princess stove and a porch light! The tow vehicle is a 1959 Cadillac Fleetwood. This is the top-of-the-line Cadillac four door for 1959. It was factory painted in Mountain Laurel pink and came with every option available with the exception of cruise control.

Where did you find your trailer/tow vehicle?

After several years of searching, in October of 2012, I found the Shasta on an internet classified site. It was located in Logan, Utah – about 120 miles from my home. The owner was given the trailer from his father who bought it new in California.

When and who did the restoration?

P1100022 P1100024 P1110584 P1110585 P1110586 P1110587 P1110589 P1110590 P1110591 P1110592 P1110593

It took us one full Winter, Summer and Fall to restore. The previous owners had taken pretty good care of it, but it had suffered some terrible water leaks. This had caused some wood rot which meant we had completely strip the interior down, replace some panels and refinish all of the wood. We also replaced the sub floor and installed all new plywood. Then we covered it in ‘Starry Night’ Marmoleum. The Yellow Glacier counter tops had been damaged by wear and tear and didn’t match the planned ‘new color scheme’. I found some original 1950s boomerang Formica and bought the very last sheet in stock. The sofa/bed was replaced with a custom fit pillow top mattress and a fixed frame was created underneath. The Princess stove was originally dark gradated brown. We stripped it and had it porcelain painted gradated pink.
The exterior had been painted with a brush and roller solid white with a blue belt around the center. Not Shasta branding! We stripped it down and had it painted it with auto acrylic enamel to match the Cadillac Mountain Laurel pink. The wheels had plastic wheel covers held on by coat hanger wire. We put white walls and baby moons to give it a 50s look. The wings had been long gone and the previous owner had some porcelain signs painted white to replace them. I found some smaller aluminum wings and mounted them on to the porcelain for a unique two tone look.

What is unique or interesting about your trailer?

2012-08-31_shasta(1)+1interior1 interior2 P1100014 IMG_3332 IMG_3333 IMG_3334 IMG_3337

What is most interesting is when we drive down the road, people stop what they’re doing and take out their cell phone cameras. This can be dangerous and has caused a few near miss accidents at intersections. We love the attention but sometimes its embarrassing how people act on the roads while gawking.

What do you like about vintage trailers?

I love everything vintage. We own several classic Cadillacs. We hope to own a larger vintage RV someday.

Have you been to many rallies and what do you like about them?

We have been to two rallies so far. The last one in Crystal Hot Springs, Utah was amazing. Loved everything about it! We even got two other families to join the TCT and they really enjoyed the last rally too!

What clubs do you belong to?

I have been the President of the Intermountain Cadillac Club for the past 15 years.

Can you share an interesting bit of information that most people don’t know about yourself?

I have always been a car enthusiast, but ended up being a traveling, recording and performing rock musician in my earlier years. Settling down to be a family man, I became a creative art director in the advertising industry for the last 25 years. I have to admit, though, I am addicted to classic and vintage cars and trailers.

So glad we joined TCT and look forward to a long relationship with our new friends!

 

 Posted by at 9:43 am
Nov 122014
 

Names and location

John in the California Central Coast.

Trailer and tow vehicles

Scotsman trailer and a 1952 Dodge Panel … also my daily driver work truck.
2014-04-08 17.27.21
2014-07-20 09.07.17 2014-07-20 09.08.03 2014-04-08 15.22.46  2014-05-28 21.21.17 2014-07-20 08.54.57 2014-07-20 08.55.55 2014-07-20 09.03.35

Where did you find your trailer/tow vehicle?

Truck found in San Diego took one year to finish. Trailer was a basket case found in Orcutt CA. It also took one year to complete

When and who did the restoration?

The truck was an unfinished project … so I completed it except for the final paint coat.  I started and finished the trailer.  When found it was disassembled for repairs and the prior owner couldn’t complete the project, … so I purchased it and completed.

What is unique or interesting about your trailer?

I think the Scotsman trailers are unique in that they are a solid plywood framed trailer with no wood framing members.  They are very solid, rugged and yet light weight. 
Scotsman trailers are lightweight … Usually do not require brakes. They are exceedingly sturdy, having a solid plywood shell. It was a total skin off, half body off process and took about one year to resurrect. If you need a very lightweight classic trailer and are equipped for the repairs … These are great trailers. The body appearance kept its unique appearance through most of its production years.  That’s kinda cool because the newer look similar to the older.

What do you like about vintage trailers?

Cozy!  They just look plain cool compared even to the modern remakes.

Have you been to many rallies and what do you like about them?

Never … even though I live near Pismo.  Just usually don’t have the time.

What clubs do you belong to?

This one (Tin Can Tourists), a fiberglass trailer club and an old tractor club.  They are a valued source of information and are much appreciated. 

Can you share an interesting bit of information that most people don’t know about yourself?

Really, …  not much about me, … rather, the awesome history of some of our past human inventions …. old trailers, cars and trucks to name a few.  These don’t easily fit in a museum … so they are at risk.
 Posted by at 1:44 pm
Nov 082014
 

Who are you and where are you from?

We’re Mike and Wendy Dager and we live in Simi Valley, California, a bedroom community in Ventura County, just a few miles northwest of Los Angeles County.  We’re California natives who grew up in the San Fernando Valley. We’ll be celebrating our thirtieth wedding anniversary – January 27, 2015—even though my parents warned Mike not to marry me!
Mike is a telecommunications contractor and a general contractor who is often working on household projects in his spare time. My friends wish we could clone him! I’m a professional freelance writer whose work includes a newspaper opinion column, magazine articles, advertorials, button slogans, greeting card copy, and humorous mystery novels. I’ve also been collecting and wearing vintage clothes, jewelry and accessories for more than 25 years, and am curator of The Vintage Purse Gallery, an online vintage handbag museum, featuring my collection of over 400 purses, accessories and ephemera. We have two grown daughters and a four-year-old grandson.

What trailer and tow vehicle do you own?

landcot2I’m currently working toward earning a certificate in Art Museum and Gallery Studies from CSU, East Bay (online). My final project is a feasibility study for the establishment of a vintage purse and fashion museum. After doing a lot of research, I realized this endeavor would be very costly, so I decided instead to revamp my online museum, plus supplement it with a mobile art installation consisting of a series of purse exhibits inside a vintage RV.
We went on a search for just the right RV–size-wise and cost-wise–eventually acquiring a 1961 Aristocrat Land Commander. After it’s restored, it will be towed by Mike’s 1966 red and white Ford F-100 to locations in and around the Los Angeles and Ventura County areas. It’s also towable by our motorhome, should we eventually be able to take the museum to a more distant location. It depends on our work schedules and family obligations.

Where did you find your trailer/tow vehicle?

landmike1We spent a lot of time looking at online ads and soon learned that vintage RVs get snapped up pretty quickly. The Land Commander was only the second one we were able to see in person, so we decided to go for it because we knew if we spent too much time discussing it, it’d be gone. We bought it from a guy in Santa Paula, California, about thirty miles from where we live. He’d bought it for a relative as a temporary home, but the relative found other accommodations, so it was never cleaned or emptied out. It cost $1,300 and included a bunch of the previous owner’s possessions (not the guy we bought it from, but the guy he bought it from). We took out all the stuff inside, donating what we could and throwing away what wasn’t worth donating.
We also got an unexpected bonus: all of the trailer’s registration paperwork dating back to the original owners in 1961. They were from Ventura, California, so it was interesting to see that the trailer had stayed local all these years. We learned, too, that the medicine cabinet, which Mike removed, was handmade by another local man in 1962, who’d signed the back of it with his name, city and date.
The tow vehicle, Mike’s 1966 Ford F-100, is a recent acquisition as well. Earlier this year, Mike sold his 1928 Ford Model A hot rod and his 2010 Chevy truck so we could put a down payment on a nice used motorhome. He missed owning a vintage vehicle—we’ve always had at least one hanging around—so the F-100 was an inexpensive and really cool replacement for both the hot rod and the truck.

When and who did the restoration?

landinside1The RV is in the process of being restored by Mike and me, with Mike doing all the labor and us working together on the design process. We’re considering some unusual options since this isn’t an actual restoration for camping, but a mobile art gallery. For instance, we’re thinking of creating large double doors that swing out so visitors don’t have to enter the trailer, but can view it in its entirety, with the vintage purses behind Plexiglas. We’ll also add lighting, shelving, and signage, and plan to incorporate the original couch and Formica tables to keep that Mid-Century Modern vibe.
Several people have suggested that we make the trailer itself look like a purse—with folding handles on top—but I think that might be a little too much. We’ll probably do a somewhat traditional paint job, maybe with a wrap featuring a vintage-style pin-up girl holding a purse. This, of course, is a long way down the road (sorry, terrible pun). For more about the restoration, visit www.RVPurseMuseum.com.

What is unique or interesting about your trailer?

land3Using a vintage trailer to house a business is not in itself unusual—there are many old RVs that are mobile stores or food trucks—but, as far as I know, there aren’t any in use as art exhibits, so we’re excited about trying something new. We’re hoping to take it to vintage fashion expos, RV rallies, and businesses such as other museums, which will allow us to park it temporarily on their properties for viewing. We don’t plan to charge admission, but will use it to advertise The Vintage Purse Gallery website,www.VintagePurseGallery.com, which will also remain free to visitors. When we revamp the website–probably after the first of the year–we will add a store with vintage clothing and purse-related swag.

What do you like about vintage trailers

For me, what’s great about vintage trailers is they really appeal to my personal aesthetic, which is all about having a huge appreciation for vintage clothing. It’s so true that “they don’t make ‘em like they used to.” I have 1940s rayon dresses that are still in perfect condition, but my brand new department store cotton T-shirts fall apart after washing them a few times!  When I go on work assignments for the newspaper for which I freelance, I usually wear an embroidered or beaded vintage sweater with a pencil skirt. Whenever I go out just casually—to the supermarket and such—I always wear vintage jewelry and carry a vintage purse. Not everyone knows that my clothes and accessories are vintage, but I often get compliments on my style. I equate that to ownership of a vintage trailer. Not everyone is an RV aficionado, but they certainly appreciate the look, the style and the era. For Mike, I think it’s about the vintage vehicle aspect. We’ve owned a number of different vintage vehicles—him even before we got married, and then all throughout our married life together—so acquiring a 1961 trailer is a natural evolution of our combined admiration of vintage things.

Can you share an interesting bit of information that most people don’t know about yourself?

I was once named one of America’s Most Unique Characters by USA Network in its “Show Us Your Character” contest. Also, my novel I Murdered the PTA was a Court TV (now truTV) top five finalist in its Search for the Next Great Crime Writer contest.  And I have no idea what my real hair color is because I have a habit of dyeing it about every two weeks, sometimes purple or pink.  And now you know why my parents tried to talk Mike out of marrying me!

Anything you’d like to share that wasn’t asked?

I think I may have over-shared! But if you have any questions, let me know (wdager@sbcglobal.net)
 Posted by at 9:21 am
Oct 292014
 

Names and location

Bob Bociek and Beverly Wolfe, Alderson, WV

Trailer and tow vehicles

1992 Airstream Excella, 25′, 1995 Ford F250 XLT, 7.3L Diesel
track-trailer+1as3 as5 as6 as1 as2

Where did you find your trailer/tow vehicle?

The trailer was found during an online search, previous owner delivered it to our place in Connecticut from Michigan on his way to Florida.  We wanted the Ford with a diesel and preferred 2 wheel drive to save some on the mileage.  Finding a 2 wheel drive in New England was next to impossible so we checked a dealer in Corinth Mississippi who had the exact vehicle we were in search of.  Mississippi? The back-story:  Bev’s originally from Corinth and we were heading that way in a few weeks to visit family.  We flew down, transport plate in hand, bought the truck, sacrificed the return tickets and drove it back.

When and who did the restoration?

We made the improvements to the trailer, (previous owner removed the flooring and installed hardwood.)  First was removing the twin beds, sealing leaks and re-skinning part of the under-belly.  We added a queen bed, replaced the damaged water heater, recovered the couch, made new curtains and pillows, painted the drab dark paneling to match the speckled roof and replaced the door hardware.  This year we had the truck freshened up, body work and a fresh coat of paint by a local garage.  We just completed the removal of the clearcoat from the trailer and are in the process of polishing her up.

What is unique or interesting about your trailer?

Outside of changing the bedroom floor plan, we covered the inside ceiling with antique travel post cards from our collection.

What do you like about vintage trailers?

Along with the look, (we don’t care much for the big-white-boxes) the Airstreams were built to last.  After 22 years it’s still a solid unit.  We’ve seen trailers half her age come apart at the seems.

Have you been to many rallies and what do you like about them?

None yet

What clubs do you belong to?

Just yours – the Tin Can Tourists

Can you share an interesting bit of information that most people don’t know about yourself?

We’ve been living in the rig since 2012 when we purchased the Greenbrier River Campground in Alderson, WV.  Bev left her post as director of legal operations at a fortune 500 company and I mine as managing arborist of a New York based tree care business; Connecticut office.  Had a part-time charter fishing business that we sold a few years before deciding on the campground purchase, ran it for 18 years aboard a 34′ Luhrs sportfish.  Many similarities between the boat and the RV once you get into the inner-workings of each.  We’ll be spending the winter in the rig in north east Florida again this year and getting back into the arts-and-crafts circuit with a side venture that’s Bev’s passion. No web site yet, on Facebook at: https://www.facebook.com/pages/livingstones/128303663850724

Anything you’d like to share that wasn’t asked?

Recently purchased a 16′ Shasta, ’64 vintage that we’ll begin work on in the spring of 2015.  Once completed, we’ll put it down by the river as a rental unit at the campground and if it catches on as we believe it will, there’s room for two more.  Considering our Airstream as an onsite rental as well once we put in an owner’s quarters.  Tough decision though, not sure if we want a lot of guests in the place we called home…
 Posted by at 7:11 am
Oct 182014
 

What type of trailer do you own?

1956 Yellowstone, 19’ park model trailer.

yellowstone at newport 2

Owned by Annie and Terry Palmer – Mesa, AZ

Where did you find your trailer/tow vehicle?

yellowstone 119In May the trailer was purchased  in Austin, TX. From 1964 to 2012 it spent most of its’ life in a park in NY.   It was then purchased and went to VA for just a couple of months before the owner was transferred to TX.

What is unique or interesting about your trailer?

yellowstone 127yellowstone 134The most interesting thing about the trailer is the fact that the interior is 95% original – un-restored. The water and propane lines were replaced, the Click/Clack couch recovered, the lower screen in the door replaced, new curtains, and a ¾ bed replaced the single size. The hot water heater was replaced with an on-demand system. They didn’t want to trust a 58 year old unit and wanted more storage. After the new unit was installed, Terry took apart the 58 year old water heater and found that the heating element and the zinc anode looked to be un-used.  Most people who have seen it think it has been restored.

The exterior has been polished,  as it was oxidized very badly. Terry did three of the five steps on the lower half and sanded the upper half before turning it over to Russels  Polishing to be finished. The light bezels have been re-chromed. Terry  extended  the tongue two feet  so the tailgate on the truck could be lowered. A receiver hitch was installed to make it harder for thieves to steal.  New tires and artillery wheels were installed. Terry has plans to paint three stripes to match the colors of the truck.

What do you like about vintage trailers?

yellowstone 133yellowstone 26Terry jokes, “ We have a vintage trailer so Annie can camp, and I have to camp so I can use my vintage trailer.” We think the vintage trailer experience is a lot like street rodding.  Some of our friends enjoy doing both. We belong to South West Street Rods, Tin Can Tourists, and also travel with, Zonie Motors, which now has a trailer division.

This is the second trailer for Annie and Terry, they started with a 13’ 1956 Dalton that they had for a year. They took that to a couple of runs in AZ,  San Diego, and Pismo.

So far this new trailer has been to Big Bear and Newport. This will be the end of the season for this year as Annie and Terry also spend several months a year at their home in St Croix, U.S. V. I.

yellowstone 130In the case of both trailers, Terry wanted the year of the trailer to be the same as his 1956 Chevy pick-up. He has had it four years, and installed dropped spindles with bigger disc brakes, chromed the bumpers and grille, power steering, a Camaro posi rear end, bucket seats, A/C, a Ron Davis aluminum radiator, and a bed cover. The current 327 cu in engine and 700 R4 transmission  was fine for the Dalton, but the Yellowstone just strains it too much. So after returning from the Caribbean,  a 2012 6.0 Chevy engine and six speed 6L90 transmission with all new wiring is going into the pick-up to be ready for next season.

 Posted by at 11:17 am
Oct 112014
 
Our fall events generally fall just before the big influx of folks looking at the gorgeous fall foliage in the Great Smokey Mountains.  We chose Maggie Valley as out location this year with a campground backing up to a stream that provided the perfect location for relaxing.  Those with campsites close to the stream could open their windows and hear it running during the night.
As the trailers filtered in, the energy began to rise.  We welcomed many new members to the TCT family and were eager to get to know them.
Our Rally Master, Joy Taylor was a flurry of activity making sure that each person was welcomed and the event volunteers were handling the necessary tasks.
On Thursday evening, we shared the most amazing array of  local cheese’s in a festive fall table scape at our Meet & Greet.  The tantalizing flavors of a variety of artisan crafted local cheese filled the table.  Ample amounts of smoked mozzarella, honey fig goat cheese, muenster, port wine, cheddar, and brie were beautifully arranged for the attendees.   To accompany the cheese there was a variety of crackers and breads available.
Friday morning, many of the attendees ventured to Catalooche in Great Smokey Mountain National park to view the Elk herd or went out exploring the area.  The afternoon found us around the creek for rousing games of life size Jenga and many other fun games.  We all enjoyed a huge potluck dinner and then retired back to our campers.  No not really, we enjoyed a wonderful s’mores bar at the fire next to the creek and more of the life size Jenga game by lantern light.
As the sun came up on Saturday morning, there was a scurry of cleaning to get done before the public arrived at 11am.  We all took advantage of the $5.00 Pancake Breakfast offered by the Boy Scouts.  It was their first fundraiser of this sort and they raiser over $600.  Additionally they earned a cooking badge for their work with us.
At 11am their was a influx of visitors that continued throughout the day.  Admission was $5.00 with all the funds going to the local The Kids in the Creak Program.  With approximately 400 visitors, we raised just shy of $2,000 for them and are thrilled we could make such a great positive impact on the community.
We had an amazing BBQ Catered dinner from Silence of the Hamm followed by a dessert potluck.  We would like to commend Gregg and Karla Perkins (owners of Silence of the Hamm) for donating the profits from the catering to the boy scout troup.
We handed out awards for Fan Favorite – (Larry and Cindy Harrington, 1960 Yellowstone) and for the Tin Can Challenge – Create a frame for your trailer tour sign – (Brent & Susie Walker)

Joy Taylor did a fantastic job and happily passed the torch to our 2015 Rally Master, Matt Whiteside’s.   We are finalizing plans for this event and hope to have details posted in the next few weeks.
 Posted by at 8:01 am
Oct 082014
 

Chad and Sandy Waller

We are Chad and Sandy Waller from Hendersonville,Tn. A suburb 15 miles north of Nashville. Chad works in the energy management dept at Vanderbilt university and I am a stay at home grand-mom. Last summer i got “a bee in my bonnet” for a vintage camper. I knew nothing about them, but i knew that i would know what i wanted when i saw it!☺ so i started looking on craigslist and after a fairly brief search found a 67 scotty in need of restoration. chad can take a bucket of bolts and turn it into a car, so i knew he could work his magic on my camper.
IMG_82223234044400 IMG_293811073176526It must’ve been love at first sight when we found somethin’ because we went to work and had her out in under 2 months for our 1st camping trip. 2 months later we put Somethin’in our hometown Christmas parade. We are having the time of our lives now, we’ve camped in the mountains and on the beach… sometimes we just go watch a movie in Somethin’ under our carport. It’s cozy and homey inside.

Trailer and tow vehicle

We have a 1967 Scotty sportsman. It’s 10 ft long  and weighs about 1000 lbs. During the restoration, i kept saying, “I’ve gotta name this camper somethin “. One day it hit me…i would name her Somethin’! And we think she  really is somethin’!!
We have a 1996 Nissan frontier truck for towing.  IMG_293749958022226

 

Where did you find your trailer?

We found our camper on craigslist and only 15 minutes from home.

When and who did the restoration?

IMG_293732013910097Chad did the restoration in less than 2 months…but he worked really fast in order to get it out camping before cold weather hit.  We bought it in July and went on our first trip in September 2013. The camper had good bones, but had water damage in both front and back ends. We replaced the ceiling, and rotten wood, cleaned, painted and decorated. We took out the gas cooktop and old icebox and added a small convection oven and mini fridge. We also installed a flat panel tv. Chad modified the storage door and installed an air conditioner on a track that we can slide in and out. The unit is under the bed.

What is unique or interesting about your trailer?

Our camper is a tiny canned ham style and decorated as we say “like grandmother’s kitchen.

What do you like about vintage trailers?

We love the charm of the vintage campers..especially the tiny canned hams. People we meet are drawn to them like we are, i think because of the nostalgia. We get thumbs up from other drivers when we’re going down the highway and people come up to us at the gas pump smiling and asking questions about somethin’!

Have you been to many rallies and what do you like about them?

We’ve been to one rally in Hiawasse, GA last may…really fun to see the other old campers.

What clubs do you belong to?

We became TCT members this summer.

Can you share an interesting bit of information that most people don’t know about yourself?

Most people don’t know that before we got somethin’,that we hadn’t done much camping. We can set her up, “glam”her, and be exploring the area in about 20 minutes as soon as we get to our campsite.

Anything you’d like to share?

It’s so gratifying to meet other campers and to hear the kind comments that they have about Somethin’. We are hooked and love to share our enthusiasm for “glamping”. It’s contagious my sister in law just bought a 1969 play mor and is in the process of restoration now.

IMG_10028867315219 IMG_9945891262230

 Posted by at 8:33 am