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little_ceaser-_sokolis_brothers [2017/08/01 05:53]
24.5.50.81 [Manufactured by The Sokolis Brothers]
little_ceaser-_sokolis_brothers [2018/09/12 20:25] (current)
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 William & Amber Wimmer: 805-674-8265,​ Paso Robles, CA 13' 1953 L. Caesar William & Amber Wimmer: 805-674-8265,​ Paso Robles, CA 13' 1953 L. Caesar
  
-Clifford Robinson 510-635-5254 ​ Oakland,​CA ​  ​13'​ Little Caesar ​ 1950+Clifford Robinson510-635-5254 ​ Oakland,​CA ​  ​13'​ Little Caesar ​ 1950
  
-Carolyn Bach-Schultz Woodinville,​ WA 1955 Little Caesar 10' 6" :-)+Carolyn Bach-SchultzWoodinville,​ WA 1955 Little Caesar 10' 6" :-)
  
-Frank & JessieLodi, CA - 1957 Little Caesar 8'+Frank & JessieLodi, CA - 1957 Little Caesar 8' 
 + 
 +Michael & Aedan Haworth: Sebastopol, CA - 
 ===== Clubs/Links ===== ===== Clubs/Links =====
 Sokolis Brothers Mfg. was Charles, Emil, Ed, Ernie, & Al who followed the advice of a buddy and started a business building small travel trailers at a factory in Sebastopol CA shortly after the war ended. Unlike most trailers from the era, they were framed with solid plywood that was skinned with aluminum. (Very early models had a masonite exterior.) ​ They were marketed at the State Fair and trade shows. The dropped axle allowed it to fit it most garages. A true family operation, the wives worked in the factory and sewed curtains at home. At the peak of production in the 50's, they employed 18 people and averaged one trailer per day. Not all the brothers worked there at the same time; some left and others came on board. The factory ceased production around 1965. Sokolis Brothers Mfg. was Charles, Emil, Ed, Ernie, & Al who followed the advice of a buddy and started a business building small travel trailers at a factory in Sebastopol CA shortly after the war ended. Unlike most trailers from the era, they were framed with solid plywood that was skinned with aluminum. (Very early models had a masonite exterior.) ​ They were marketed at the State Fair and trade shows. The dropped axle allowed it to fit it most garages. A true family operation, the wives worked in the factory and sewed curtains at home. At the peak of production in the 50's, they employed 18 people and averaged one trailer per day. Not all the brothers worked there at the same time; some left and others came on board. The factory ceased production around 1965.
little_ceaser-_sokolis_brothers.txt · Last modified: 2018/09/12 20:25 (external edit)