Article in “The Tribune” features the TCT

Vintage campers a growing trend for outdoor fun

Article from “The Tribune” in Seymour Indiana By Lew Freedman

Those who manufactured what are called vintage campers mostly decorated with colors from a different crayon box.

They strayed from the elemental to define their mobile living spaces, stressing aqua, turquoise, pink, pale yellow and mint green over dark blue, deep orange, hard green, bright red, though red does seem to sometimes cross boundaries.

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An example of what an old style vintage camper may look like. By Lew Freedman | The Tribune lfreedman@tribtown.com
James and Shannon Rodwald of Crawfordsville pose next to their 1964 Franklin camper. By Lew Freedman | The Tribune lfreedman@tribtown.com
Jennie Sandlin (left) of Spencer and daughter Michelle, next to mom’s vintage camper at a fall rally at Clifty Falls State Park in Madison. By Lew Freedman | The Tribune lfreedman@tribtown.com
Stephanie and Rocky Shearer planned to roam the country in their camper this past summer, but stayed within Indiana because of the coronavirus. By Lew Freedman | The Tribune lfreedman@tribtown.com
In full flower decoration, Jennie Sandlin’s vintage camper gets plenty of attention. Courtesy Photo
The interior of Jennie Sandlin’s camper is bright and light and she decorated it herself. Courtesy Photo
This chandelier is one of the bright touches in the interior of Jennie Sandlin’s vintage camper and makes it appear larger than it is. Courtesy Photo

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Today, the campers are called “vintage,” and drivers may be referred to as “tin can tourists” and identify strongly with a bygone era from the mid-1930s to the early 1970s, depending on parameters set by private clubs.

Some call 1969 a cut-off. Some groups call anything older than 25 vintage. The campers in general have a passionate following and bring smiles to faces on sight, from those steeped in nostalgia, to those too young to remember.

Wherever drivers steer their oldies-but-goodies vehicles and park long enough to strike up a conversation, their campers make friends.

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