Phoenix

Phoenix

Manufacturer Information

Manufactured by Heckaman Manufacturing, Inc., Phoenix Division, Nappanee, Indiana

1960s

Photos

Clubs

https://www.facebook.com/groups/580791085367220/

Penguin

PENGUIN

Manufacturer Information

Penguin Industries, Inc 2508 Middlebury St. Elkhart, Indiana 46514 Box 1284

Years built

At least 1969 1970 & 1971 ,other years unknown ( Info on this Page reprinted from 1970 Brochure )

Models

Penguin 14′-6″ and 16′ FD (front dinette) and SD (side dinette) Models Width

— All models 7′ * 16’Model

— Weight, Approx 1440 lbs., Hitch Weight Approx. 140 lbs.

* 14′-6″ Model Weight, Approx. 1200 lbs., Hitch Weight Approx. 110 lbs. Penguin 20′ FD and SD Models Length: 20′-5″

* Width: 7′. Weight: 2800 lbs.

* Hitch Weight: 300 lbs.

* 7:00 x 14 inch wheels and tires

* Steel Frame

* Insulated Sidewalls

* Double Floor Construction

* Metal Bottom

* Large Miami Type Windows

* Front Window Awning

* Brakes

* Double 20 lb. Gas Bottles

Interiors

Standard Interior Equipment (14′-6″ and 16′ models)

  • Two Burner LP gas Stove
  • 35 lb. Ice Box in 14′ Model–75 lb. Ice Box in 16′ Model
  • Gaucho Bed with accomodations for two
  • 4″ PolyFoam Cushions
  • Dinette which converts to bed
  • 110 volt and 12 volt lighting * One piece Linoleum flooring * 14″ x 14″ Lumadome Ceiling Vent
  • Wardrobe large enough for marine stool in 14′ SD and 16′ Models
  • City Water, Gas Light (in 16′ model only)
  • Heater
  • Canvas Bunk

Standard Interior Equipment ( 20′ models) FD and SD

  • Pleated Drapes
  • Marine Stool and Lavatory
  • Pressure water with 20 gal. fresh water storage tank
  • Oven Range
  • Double Sinks
  • 110 volt and 12 volt lighting
  • 5″ PolyFoam Cushion
  • 14′ x 14′ LumaDome Ceiling Vent
  • Range Hood and Power Vent
  • Awning Rail
  • Gas/Electric Refrigerator (3 cu.ft.)
  • 16,000 BTU Automatic Heater
  • Hose Bumper
  • Full Screen Door
  • OPTIONS: 20′ Model
    • Shower with telephone wand sprayer
    • Gas Water Heater
    • Swing Bunk with 3″ Mattress
    • 2 Bunk Windows
    • Blower/Fan for Heater
    • Power Roof Vent
    • Privacy Cutain
    • Gas Light
    • Gas/Electric Refrigerator(4 cu. ft.)
    • 7 way Power Plug to car

 

Standard Features

  • Height–All models: Exterior 7′-4″, Interior 6′-1″.
  • Steel Frame.
  • Heavy Duty Drop Axle.
  • Aluminum Door with Sliding window and screen.
  • Front window Awning.
  • 6:00 x 13 wheels and tires.
  • Lights include: Tail, Stop, Directional, Regulation ICC Running Lights.
  • 12 gal. Water Tank with Pump and Outside Fill.
  • Prefinished Aluminum Exterior.
  • Windows- Miami Crystal.
  • Metal Bottom.
  • One piece Molded Wheel Wells and insulated sidewalls.

 

Unique features/Options

The Logo Design was a pair of Penguins with scarves around their necks riding a bicycle built for two (no kidding). Pre-finished Aluminum Siding with Woodgrain Look Accent Panels

Optional Equipment

  • Swing Bunk with 3″ mattress
  • Rear Window
  • Gas Light and City Water (14′ Option)(STD 16′)
  • Brakes
  • Dual Gas Bottles and regulator
  • Gas/Electric Refrigerator
  • Front Overhead cabinet
  • Bumper
  • Gas Heater (STD on 16′ model)
  • Bunk Windows
  • Oven Range
  • Pressure Water with 20 gallon fresh water tank
  • Marine Stool
  • Two-Tone Interior

Photos/Videos

Nomad

Nomad

History

Manufacturer Information

Skyline’s Corporate Profile

Skyline Corporation is one of America’s leading producers of manufactured housing and recreational vehicles. These products are built in plants located from coast to coast and marketed nationally through independent retailers.

HISTORY

Founded in 1951 in Elkhart, Indiana, Skyline initially produced the affordable housing units popularly known as house trailers or mobile homes. These units evolved into today’s manufactured housing. In 1960, Skyline opened its first travel trailer plant. During its 55-plus years of operation, Skyline has built more than 880,000 homes and 465,000 recreational vehicles (RVs), most of them travel trailers. Its sales over the years total in excess of $15.4 billion.

ORGANIZATION

Corporate headquarters, shown on the front cover, is in Elkhart, Indiana. It houses marketing services, accounting, information technology, engineering, product development, financial, legal, and other functions. Products are built by 21 operating divisions in 11 states from coast to coast. Of the 21 divisions, 16 produce housing and five produce RVs.

FINANCIAL

Skyline has operated in the black every year since it was founded. Its balance sheet is among the soundest in American industry with a strong cash position and no corporate debt. Skyline is publicly owned and its shares are traded on the New York Stock Exchange.

HOUSING PRODUCTS

Skyline produces a wide range of manufactured and modular homes with price ranges to fit most budgets. Skyline homes are sold under a number of identifying names. The single-section manufactured homes emphasize affordability and frequently are sited in specially-developed manufactured housing developments. The multi-sectional and modular homes are also very affordable and in appearance they are indistinguishable from site-built housing. Many of the multi-sectional and modular houses are sited on conventional residential lots.

COMMITMENT OF EXCELLENCE

Skyline’s Commitment of Excellence program asks customers to evaluate their total buying experience. The result is a Customer Satisfaction Index (CSI) that serves as a benchmark from which we can measure progress. While the index continues to improve, neither Skyline nor our dealers intend to relax until the Total Customer Satisfaction goal is achieved.

RV PRODUCTS

Skyline builds three types of towable RVs: conventional travel trailers, fifth wheel travel trailers, and park models. The principal brand names for these products are Nomad, Layton, Aljo, and Rampage. All Skyline RVs are UL Classified.

Photos

1962 Nomad

1967 Nomad Road King brochure

1969 Nomad

1966 Nomad
1965 Nomad 16′ Vintage Travel Trailer
1968 Nomad Vintage Travel Trailer
Vintage 1969 Nomad Travel Trailer
1963 Nomad Vintage Camper

Meredith Reynolds & Paul Klein,Saint Johns Michigan purchased 1960-something Nomad on January 3, 2010

Not sure of the model year, but this picture was taken during the summer of 1971 of our family’s 19′ Nomad:

Some owners

Mark & Kathy Moore / Howard, OH /purchased Nomad Sept.27, 2008

Gilkie

Gilkie Travel Trailer

Made in Terra Haute, Indiana in the 1920s-50s

Campers who wanted to get close to nature — but not too close — loved fold-out tent trailers. These two-wheelers folded down for easy towing by day and then mushroomed into miniature homes at night. Story has it that Warren and Ray Gilkison designed and built their first tent trailer in their father’s machine shop for a family camping trip.

Gilkie built folding tent trailer and hard bodied trailers until the 1950s.

Specifications

Make & Model: Gilkie tent trailer, about 1927

Maker: E.P. Gilkison & Sons Company, Terre Haute, Indiana

Features: extra-wide 28 inch door, 82 square feet, full-size beds, standing height inside, electric lights, steel kitchenette, icebox, screens, water- and mildew-proof army-cotton-duck tent

Height: 53.5 inches

Width: 13 feet

Wheelbase: 8 feet 6 inches

Overall length: 9 feet 9 inches

Pictures

 

 

Liberty

Liberty

1941-1980s

1958 Spence Craft
liberty January 1942

 

Liberty trailers were made by the Liberty Coach Co. in Bremen, Indiana. The Liberty trailer was one of the most exclusive trailers made in the late 40s through early 50s. It was the only vintage trailer with double pane windows, and a sophisticated interior air flow ventilation system designed to keep the trailer cooler in summer and warmer in winter.The interior workmanship is truly marvelous and the woodwork is comparable with antique boat building standards. The restoration is faithful to the wonderful craftsmanship of a bygone era, and at the same time takes advantage of modern plumbing and electrical improvements. Liberty was spawned from the Elcar Coach Company.

This 1948 29ft Liberty trailer was made by the Liberty Coach Co. in Bremen
This 1948 29ft Liberty trailer was made by the Liberty Coach Co. in Bremen
1950 Liberty Air Queen travel trailer
1948 Liberty 33′
1950 Liberty Air Queen
1950 Liberty

1951 Liberty Coach Ad Vintage Campers Trailers, Camper Trailers, Manufactured Housing, New Mobile
1948 Liberty Trailer Vintage Campers Trailers, Camper Trailers, Mobile Homes, Rv Camping,
1949 Liberty 013104 Vintage Campers Trailers, Camper Trailers, Remodeled Campers, Remodels, Liberty

 

Layton

Layton

Manufacturer Information

Skyline who builds Layton is the only UL certified travel trailer and have been building them since 1950! Skyline Corporation – Makers of Nomad, Layton and Aljo travel trailers and fifth wheels, Elkhart, IN. Founded in 1951 in Elkhart, Indiana, Skyline initially produced the affordable housing units popularly known as house trailers or mobile homes. These units evolved into today’s manufactured housing. In 1960, Skyline opened its first travel trailer plant. During its 54-plus years of operation, Skyline has built more than 870,000 homes and 460,000 recreational vehicles (RV’s), most of them travel trailers. Its sales over the years total in excess of $15 billion. Skyline builds three types of towable RV’s: conventional travel trailers, fifth wheel travel trailers, and park models. The principal brand names for these products are Nomad, Layton, Aljo, and Rampage. All Skyline RVs are UL Classified. Skyline is committed to producing the best products at the best prices. It has earned a reputation for uncompromising integrity in all of its relationships with communities, suppliers, retailers, and with the hundreds of Americans who live in Skyline-built homes and enjoy Skyline-built RVs. Skyline Corporation designs and produces manufactured housing and recreational vehicles (RVs). Approximately 80 percent of the company’s total sales are derived from manufactured homes, which are sold under several different trade names. Skyline makes two basic types of manufactured housing: single-section mobile homes and multi-section homes. Single-section homes, which range from 36 to 80 feet in length and 12 to 18 feet in width, are often located in designated mobile home parks. Because their size makes them easy to move from place to place, they are considered “mobile homes.” Skyline’s multi-section homes, however, are larger and more closely resemble site-built homes. Buyers typically place these homes on traditional lots, and rarely, if ever, move them. Almost 70 percent of the homes produced by Skyline are multi-sections. The company’s recreational vehicle segment manufactures three types of towable RVs–conventional travel trailers, fifth-wheel trailers, and park models–as well as a line of slide-in truck campers. They are sold under the “Nomad,” “Layton,” “Aljo,” and “WeekEnder” trademarks. Skyline operates 25 manufacturing plants in 12 states and distributes its products through a national network of manufactured housing and RV dealers. Skyline Coach, the predecessor to Skyline Corporation, was established in 1951 in Elkhart, Indiana. Its founder, Julius Decio, started the business to produce mobile homes, which were commonly called “house trailers” at the time. The business Decio chose was by no means an uncommon one for Elkhart and its surrounding communities. For 20 years, the city–located in northern central Indiana, just a few miles from the Michigan border–had been a major hub for the mobile home industry. The area’s mobile home business had begun in 1933, when a local merchant decided to try replicating a contraption he had seen at the Chicago World’s Fair that looked like a tent on wheels. Setting up shop in Elkhart, he began building “house trailers,” which resembled rudimentary recreational travel trailers. The trailers’ affordability and mobility made them a good option during the Great Depression, when many families traveled across country looking for jobs and a better life. The success of this first mobile home manufacturer led others to start similar businesses, and gradually the region became a major source of house trailers. During the Dust Bowl of 1937 and 1938, people began using house trailers not just to travel in, but as actual homes. In response, manufacturers modified their products to make them more closely correspond to traditional homes, increasing the size of the units and adding more amenities. By the end of World War II, mobile homes had evolved into something much different from their travel-trailer predecessors. Larger and more elaborate in design, they were no longer meant to be towed, camper-style, across the country by families on the move. Rather, they had become an alternative and more affordable type of house, typically stationed in one place. There were, however, a number of manufacturers still producing the early smaller trailers, primarily for use as recreational vehicles. After the war, these manufacturers essentially split off from the mobile home industry to form the RV industry. It was into this newly bifurcated industry that Julius Decio entered when he began building house trailers in a friend’s “welding garage.” His early efforts met with success, and the business was profitable from its first year in operation. In 1952, Decio’s 22-year-old son, Art, returned to Elkhart from Chicago, where he had just graduated college. Art quickly took an active role in his father’s business, working as a division manager in the plant and helping to build the fledgling company. In 1956, he became Skyline’s CEO. The company expanded geographically under Art Decio’s capable leadership, targeting emerging mobile housing markets in retiree states, such as Florida. Another important facet of the new CEO’s administration was a movement toward near-total reliance on third-party suppliers for materials. Whereas many mobile home manufacturers at that time produced some of their own cabinets and building supplies, Art Decio preferred to order virtually everything from outside sources. By having suppliers deliver inventory on a “just in time” basis, Skyline was able to minimize the need for warehouse space, reduce waste, and better control inventory. Decio kicked off the 1960s by taking Skyline public. At the time of its initial public offering, the company boasted an impressive string of profitable years and no corporate debt. Skyline’s second milestone of 1960 was to diversify its business by opening a travel trailer and RV plant in Elkhart. This reunion of the mobile home and RV industries made sense on several levels for the company. Since the industry split in the early 1950s, both the RV and housing segments had remained well represented in northern Indiana. Dozens of RV manufacturers–and the second- and third-tier suppliers supporting them–had production facilities in the region. In addition, many of the materials required to produce mobile homes corresponded with the materials needed to produce RVs. Therefore, Skyline’s addition of an RV division allowed for certain inventory and cost efficiencies. Skyline also used the proceeds from its 1960 IPO to expand its mobile home business via acquisition. In 1962, the company acquired Homette Corporation and Layton Homes Corporation. The following year, Skyline bought Buddy Mobile Homes, and in 1966, added Academy Mobile Homes to its growing portfolio. The company also changed its name from Skyline Coach to Skyline Corporation. During the 1960s and early 1970s, low interest rates and a generally stable economy had combined to keep the manufactured housing business in high gear. According to the Manufactured Housing Institute, the industry hit an all-time high in 1972, reporting shipments of more than half a million units. In 1973 and 1974, however, interest rates began to climb, and housing sales began to plunge. Shipments of manufactured homes declined by 42 percent in 1974 and another 35 percent in 1975. The RV industry, likewise, fell on hard times in the 1970s. The OPEC oil embargo of 1973 and the resulting hike in gas prices put the brakes on recreational driving. This, combined with the rising interest rates, caused RV sales to fall off. Already contending with bleak market conditions, Skyline and other producers of manufactured housing were confronted with still another hurdle in 1976. Concerned about mobile homes’ safety, Congress enacted legislation that set stricter standards for their construction. Officially changing the product’s name to “manufactured housing,” the government required all mobile homes to meet stringent manufacturing, fire, electricity, and safety codes. The tougher requirements–and the costs associated with compliance–spurred a wave of closings and consolidations in the manufactured housing industry. Despite the odds against it, Skyline managed to remain solvent and successful throughout the industry slump, never once posting an annual loss. In 1978, the company expanded again, purchasing Country Vans Conversion. The market for RVs improved in the early years of the new decade; between 1980 and 1984, the number of vehicles shipped increased by more than 80 percent. The market for manufactured housing was slower to rebound, however, with sales remaining at levels much lower than they were in the early 1970s. Skyline continued to show improved earnings and remained debt-free–but to do so, it had to trim costs and streamline operations. In 1983, the company had 28 operational and six idle manufactured housing plants. Just four years later, cost-cutting measures had reduced that number to 23 operational and two idle plants. Skyline also hedged against further economic downturns by amassing cash reserves. In 1987, one-fourth of the company’s pretax income came from interest. The 1990s ushered in better interest rates than consumers had seen in more than a decade, and sales of manufactured housing picked up immediately. Although Skyline’s sales also improved, the company was unable to keep pace with its competitors and consequently surrendered part of its market share. Management attributed the market share loss to a lack of capacity in areas where the manufactured housing markets were expanding fastest. In an April 1996 interview with Investor’s Business Daily, Decio cited Georgia and Texas as two such rapid-growth markets, pointing out that Skyline did not have a strong manufacturing presence in either state. “Even though we’re a national company, at certain times we can’t keep up,” he said. To bolster output and remedy the situation, Skyline initiated an aggressive expansion plan. In 1994, the company upgraded its manufactured housing plant in Sugarcreek, Ohio, and its RV plant in McMinnville, Oregon. The following year, Skyline laid out another $10 million to renovate four more facilities–in Indiana, Pennsylvania, Florida, and Louisiana. In addition to boosting production, the upgrades were designed to allow all facilities to manufacture a wider range of products. The expansion program paid off; between 1992 and 1995, net income improved by more than 50 percent. In 1997, Skyline’s sales of manufactured housing fell slightly, and the resulting dip in total sales broke the company’s five-year record of modest but steady annual increases. A major reason for the decline was an exceptionally harsh winter, which slowed housing sales in some parts of the United States. Another factor was a general softening in the demand for manufactured housing nationwide, which led many of Skyline’s dealers to reduce their inventories. The company’s RV division had a better year, however. RV sales increased by more than 14 percent over 1996 sales, reversing the previous year’s RV industry slump. The year 1998 saw a flip-flop in the fortunes of Skyline’s two business segments. The market for manufactured housing improved in the second half of the year, driving up Skyline’s housing sales. In addition to the overall market improvement, the housing segment benefited from a stronger demand for multi-section homes, which commanded higher prices than single-section homes. On the other hand, Skyline’s recreational vehicle sales decreased in 1998, despite the fact that, industry wide, demand for the vehicles increased. Skyline appeared to have both its business segments on track in 1999. The market for manufactured housing remained relatively steady through the first half of the year. More significantly, consumer demand for multi-section homes continued to grow, pushing the company’s housing dollars up despite a slight decrease in actual units sold. As its quality continued to improve, manufactured housing was expected to become an attractive option for a wider range of homeowners. Skyline’s RV business also appeared to be on the upswing as 1999 progressed, showing gains both in units sold and in sales income. This increase was due in large part to overall favorable economic conditions and increased discretionary income, which allowed consumers to spend more for recreational products and activities. Since its inception in the 1950s, Skyline had been more of a tortoise than a hare, taking few risks and growing slowly and sure-footedly. As the company prepared to leave the 20th century behind, it showed no signs of altering that approach. Because demand in both of Skyline’s major markets was so closely tied to economic cycles, it was impossible to predict how the company might fare in the future. So long as the general economy remained strong, however, it seemed likely that Skyline would thrive.

Years built

Models

Pictures

1961 Layton Vintage Trailer
My 63′ Layton — vintage camper trailer
Vintage RV: Restored 1971 Layton Travel Trailer
1967 Layton Vintage Camper

 

International Harvester

Manufacturer Information

International Harvester offered a camper for their Scout 80/800 models

Years built

1963

Models

The patent

US3325205

Pictures

An advertising photo

Advertising photograph of a Scout Camper with “bed ‘wings’ extended”. A woman pours coffee at the back door and outside a man by a canoe readies his fishing gear. Accompanying press release states: “Open the back door of a new Scout de luxe [sic] Camper by International and you step into a modern compact home on wheels. The tended ‘wings’ of the house are foam-padded beds. Inside is a stand-up galley complete with range, sink, refrigerator, and an adjoining dinette table and benches. A chemical toilet hidden in the wall can be pulled out and screened from view. There are screened windows in the bedroom wings, and screens can be obtained for the Scout front door windows. Also available is a canopy to form a roofed patio at the Scout Camper’s back door. Power for the all-wheel drive Scout Camper is provided by a 93 hp. Comanche engine.”

1963 Scout Camper Looks Like A Pop Up Camper Placed Sideways On A Pick Up Truck

Vehicles like the CJ5 Jeep Camper gained in popularity in the late 60s. But there were others before it.

In 1963, International Harvester developed a truck camper based on the petite Scout 80 chassis, a competitor to the Jeep CJ 4×4.

1963 Scout Camper with fold-out sleeping quarters.

Because there are so few IH Scout truck campers remaining today, sale prices can go fairly high. We found one that sold on eBay last year for nearly $20,000.

Some sellers have said that most of the IH truck campers for sale have a white color scheme, with the red scheme becoming more rare.

It’s tough to find the red-painted IH Scout campers today.

In ‘camping mode’.

Here’s the more commonly found white paint scheme.

Scout Connection provides restoration services, parts, and Scout trucks for sale on their website. They’ve got just a single Scout camper available at time of publishing.

According to the Wisconsin Historical Society, an advertisement for the 1963 Scout 80 camper read,

Open the back door of a new Scout de luxe [sic] Camper by International and you step into a modern compact home on wheels. The tended ‘wings’ of the house are foam-padded beds. Inside is a stand-up galley complete with range, sink, refrigerator, and an adjoining dinette table and benches. A chemical toilet hidden in the wall can be pulled out and screened from view. There are screened windows in the bedroom wings, and screens can be obtained for the Scout front door windows. Also available is a canopy to form a roofed patio at the Scout Camper’s back door. Power for the all-wheel drive Scout Camper is provided by a 93 hp. Comanche engine.

Close-up of the fold-out sleeping quarters.

Remember these spartan cabs?

This family looks like they’re enjoying a nice outing in a Scout camper (from a vintage ad).

Four Wheeler has more on the history of the Scout camper, and your best bet to buy one might be Scout Connection. Sometimes these Scout campers come up on eBay, but we’ve seen only one in the last year or so.

1963 SCOUT CAMPER – CAMPING ON ALL FOUR

1963 Scout Camper - Camping on All Four
Photographers: Chris Brooks

Motorized camping was not a new pastime in 1963, but campers built on a 4×4 chassis were still very uncommon. As far as we know, the first production compact 4×4 chassis-mounted camper came from IH (International Harvester) in 1963. Built on a Scout 80 100-inch wheelbase chassis, it remains one of the very few of its type ever built.

It started early in 1962 when Fibertron, a new division of Winner Boats in Dickson, Tennessee, developed a fiberglass camper body to fit the then-new Scout chassis. It isn’t clear whether Fibertron instigated the idea or International, but Fibertron built a prototype in the summer of 1962 and the International sales department went ape over it. The Motor Truck Committee approved ordering 88 units for initial distribution and shows. A dealer announcement went out on October 25, and production began at the end of November 1962. As far as we can tell, the first public viewing came at the NADA (National Auto Dealers Association) in Florida on January 12-16, 1963. The IH sales staff gleefully predicted sales up to 400 units the first year.

01 1963 International Scout Camper Photo 99154386

The Deluxe Camper added about 750 pounds to the weight and $1,800 to the price of a ’63 Scout 80 4×4. This is a very rare survivor found by Scout Connection. It’s original and unrestored, having been originally shipped to Memphis, Tennessee, after it was built on December 10, 1962, as one of a batch of about 30 done in mid-December. At the time of writing, Scout Connection, a Scout Light Line parts supplier and Scout restoration outfit in Iowa, had recently acquired it. It’s the 12th camper built by serial and line sequence number.


The Camper started with a special Scout configuration. Required was the new heavy-duty 3,500-pound GAWR Dana 44 rear axle (RA-9 or RA 23 in IH parlance), which came with heavy-duty springs, larger brakes, and HD shocks. The new Walk-Thru option was required, as were bucket seats. The top, rear body panel, tailgate, and rear bumper were omitted. The original plan was to ship the Scouts to Fibertron for conversion done and the Camper would be transshipped to its final destination.There were three Camper configurations. The Standard unit included bunk foldouts without windows and no kitchen/toilet module. That left room for an owner to outfit the interior as he or shechose. The 1963 retail price was listed at $960 more than the Scout 4×4 base price of $2,021. The Deluxe had a kitchen and dinette module, which also included stove, icebox, dinette, toilet, 12-gallon water tank and pressurized water system, propane tank, and windows in the foldouts. This outfit added $1,850 to the base price of the Scout. A commercial version with just the fiberglass shell and fixed side panels was offered as well for high-volume cargo, but it’s not clear whether any of those were built. Optional were a second battery, a 15,000-BTU propane heater, a third bunk/hammock, shower attachment, rear tent, awning, luggage rack, water filtration system, privacy screens, bug screens, and a trailer hitch.

The initial idea was to offer the Camper for both the 4×4 and the 4×2 Scouts. A couple of 4×2 orders were received before IH decided they didn’t want to retool to put the HD axle in the 4×2. At the time, the 4x2s had only 4-lug axles with a 2,300-pound GAWR Model 27 rear axle.

A big batch of Campers was built in December 1962 and January 1963 (all ’63 models). The first were earmarked for shows and displays and they made the rounds of car, camping and outdoor shows. The “official” announcement came February 5, 1963, even though the Campers had been seen already. There seemed to be a lot of interest and excitement, but it did not translate into orders. By March 1963, the 88 units originally built had fulfilled the only orders received, and the predicted 400 sales didn’t look very doable.


02 1963 International Scout Camper Photo 171507647

The conversion added about three feet to the tail of the Scout, which didn’t do anything for the departure angle. The rear step bumper and hitch are the original pieces built for the kit, though the hitch was optional.


Right away, the sold units had problems. Cracking of the fiberglass, the camper body breaking away from the Scout body, the rear door hinges breaking, and a multitude of little problems with the camper portion. Rough use seemed to shake the structure into failure and the whole project was rapidly heading into the “whoops” category.Fibertron began reengineering the unit and, by May, had an improved model. By then, IH had really cooled on the idea based on the low sales. The improved camper was tested on the Belgian-Block “Bone Shaker” test track and performed satisfactorily, but on May 27, IH pulled the plug anyway. The product was gradually withdrawn from sales literature, the few orders left outstanding were fulfilled, and IH washed their hands of it. The last Campers were built in June 1963. The records are not clear on exactly how many were built. Piecing disparate informational tidbits together leads to less than 100 built in total. There were a good number of warranty issues left to deal with after the fact.


03 1963 International Scout Camper Photo 99154383

The only Camper known to have been restored was done by Chris Brooks from Washington a few years back. It was Harvester Red when acquired and he repainted it the same color, not knowing if it was original. It turned to be the only red Scout Camper built, making Brooks a very happy man. It was built November 29, 1962, and was possibly used at the NADA convention in January of 1963.


Later analysis shows it wasn’t a terrible idea. The market was ready for such a unit but probably not in the numbers International was hoping, and there were some negatives. The marketing downside was that it turned a multipurpose Scout into a single purpose machine. Strike two was the build quality—or should we say lack thereof. The quirky layout worked against it as well. And the price was high. Without getting too elaborate, a buyer could put $4,000 into a Deluxe Scout Camper (about $30,000 2015 dollars and double the cost of a plain Scout) and easily get it up to $5,000 if he or she ordered all the bells and whistles (nearly $40,000 in 2015). Those costs really narrow the market for a single-purpose camping rig, regardless of then or now.International Harvester soon glommed onto the slide-in camper concept, and these soon became available for Scouts. In many ways that was a better idea, as it could be a camper as needed and be “regular” Scout as well. The Scout Camper remains one of the more interesting “what might have been” dead-ends in Scout and 4×4 history. There are perhaps five left that are intact, and you’re looking at the two best ones. You can read more about this Scout and others in the upcoming 416-page Scout Encyclopedia from Octane Press.


04 1963 International Scout Camper Photo 171507644

“Deploy Bunks!” Austin Faeth of Scout Connection demonstrates how to deploy the fold-out bunks on the camper at the 2015 IH Scout and Light Truck Nationals at Troy, Ohio. They are roomy, reasonably comfortable, and one of the better features. In retrospect, the standard unit without the kitchen module was the one to buy but almost none were produced. Of the five or six known Camper survivors, and only one is a Standard.


The Details: ’63 Scout 80 Camper
Owner: Scout Connection
Estimated value: $25,000
Engine: 152ci 4-cylinder, OHV, IH 4-152
Power (hp): 93@4,400 rpm (86 net)
Torque (lb-ft): 143 @ 2,400 (137 net)
Bore & stroke (in): 3.88×3.22
Comp. ratio: 8.19:1
Transmission: 3-speed, Warner T-90 (IH T-14)
Transfer case: 2-speed, Spicer 18 (IH TC-144)
Front axle: Spicer 27A (IH FA-14)
Rear axle: Spicer 44 (IH RA-9)
Axle ratio: 4.27:1
Tires: 6.00-16 NDT
Wheelbase (in): 100
GVW (lbs): 3,900
Fuel capacity (gal): 11 (11 gal. aux. opt.)
Min. grd. clearance (in): 9
Approach angle (deg): 34

05 1963 International Scout Camper Photo 99154380

“If it had a set of wings, then I know she could fly.” Well, here are the wings, but with only a 93hp four, it ain’t no “Little Deuce Coupe.” Actually the foldouts were a clever idea to the space problems found in a small vehicle like a Scout.

06 1963 International Scout Camper Photo 171507638

The ’63 Scout underwent a good deal of very welcome upgrades. A couple of them are visible here. Roll-up windows became an option, replacing the notorious “guillotine” type sliders. From this point in the ’63 model year to when the sliders went away after the ’65s (except as a special order), 90 to 95 percent of Scouts were ordered with rollups. The Walk-Thru option with bucket seats and no pickup bulkhead debuted on the ’62 as the means to make the Scout a true station wagon with an accessible back seat. There was an interim modification done on the assembly line or at dealers via a kit, but in the early ‘63s, a better-designed removable bulkhead debuted and remained a feature in Scouts right to the end.

07 1963 International Scout Camper Photo 99154377

Yep, the early Scout’s 152ci, 93hp four was half of the International 304ci medium-duty V-8. It was a torquey beast that put all the other bobtail fours to shame. The IH four could be built on the same tooling as the IH V-8s, with just a short spur line to finish up the unique machining. When designing this engine in 1958 and 1959, International did “bank-ectomys” to all its small series (SV) V-8s of the day to create 133ci (half the short stroke V-266), 152ci (half the short stroke V-304), and 173ci (half the long stroke V-345) fours. It opted to stick with the short-stroke engines, and since the 152 made more power than the 133 and got about the same economy, it was chosen. For the ’65s, IH turbocharged the 152 and created a nightmare, but the company redeemed itself by developing the 196ci four once the long-stroke V-392 debuted for 1966.

08 1963 International Scout Camper Photo 171507635
09 1963 International Scout Camper Photo 99154374

Holiday Rambler

Holiday Rambler

Wakarusa, Indiana

1953- Present

Manufacturer History and Firsts

Holiday Ramblers are often overlooked as the vintage classics they truly are. The Holiday Rambler Company was founded by Richard Klingler in his home town of Wakarusa, ten miles south of Elkhart, Indiana, where he started building trailer parts in a chicken coop and assembling the trailers outdoors in the 1950s. The first Holiday Rambler recreational vehicle was a travel trailer introduced to the public in 1953 by the Klingler Corporation. A fully restored example is in the RV museum in Elkhart, Indiana Always an industry pioneer, Holiday Rambler was responsible for many firsts; built-in refrigerators, holding tanks, aerodynamic radius-ed corners and originated the 48-inch-wide dinette/bed concept. In 1961, Holiday Rambler’s introduction of aluminum body framing ushered in a new era of lighter, stronger and more durable recreational vehicles (RVs). This aluminum frame (Alumaframe) became the standard for lighter and stronger RVs for 40 years. As Holiday Rambler moved into motorhomes, they were the first with tag axles and the kitchen slide-out revolutionized “interior engineering” in the field. Holiday Rambler was sold to Harley-Davidson in 1986 and later in 1996 to the Monaco Coach Corporation where its future, then under Navistar International Corp., was difficult in 2010 as it was for most motorhome manufacturers. In May 2013, Holiday Rambler was sold by Navistar International Corp. to Allied Specialty Vehicles, reviving its luxury RV status it enjoys today. With such innovation and heritage, it is surprising the trailers are barely mentioned in vintage trailer circles. However a large and growing community of proud HR owners have created 2 group pages on facebook, sharing and collecting information. I am just a proud member, my 43 year old girl has beautiful lines and a solid riveted aluminum body and framing. In truth, I could do without the shag carpeting 😉 Many owners in our community, document revamps to a late 50s to 60s style where like all other vintage trailers, the interior aesthetic is representative of some of the best in function and beauty. And just as many are faithful to restoring the original vintage features for every year represented. As equally appreciated at our facebook group, are those who break with reno tradition and remake their interiors with creative and innovative solutions that compliment the Ramblin On! mantra and the owners unique vision of comfort and esthetics. . Feel free to take a browse at the Vintage Holiday Rambler Owners Group’s page. 1953 to 1989 trailers are collected here along with a document and knowledge base about models, layouts, repairs, parts and practical how to’s on many topics provided by our 1000 and growing membership. We do not discriminate between Holiday Rambler age or model for membership and have had requests for advice up to 1989 models, which being over a quater century old are included as vintage. Come on by to see the long lost cousin of the vintage trailer community, considered by some; The lost Heir to the throne of vintage trailer design and innovation, by those of us who know

Yes, I am trailer proud!

Years built

1953 through 1959 by Mr. Klinger but was continuously in production as Holiday Rambler still up to present day

Models

  • Ramblerette
  • Holiday Vacationer – 19ft
  • Holiday Trav’ler – 22 ft
  • Holiday Rambler – 15 ft, 17.5 ft
  • Royal Holiday

Holiday Ramblers from the mid-60s can be recognized by the quilted diamond band and the stamped emblem along their sides. The USA shaped logo and color-keyed stripe distinctively branded the models.

Pictures

Vintage Holiday Rambler
1967 Holiday Rambler 21′ Vintage Travel Trailer
Dream Home Fully Renovated Vintage Holiday Rambler with Beautiful Modern Interior
Vintage Holiday Rambler
1968 Holiday Rambler 27′ Retro Campers
1963 Vintage Holiday Rambler
1969 vintage holiday rambler travel trailer
1973 Vintage Holiday Rambler “Vacationer”
Vintage Holiday Rambler

Vintage Camper Tour – 1965 Holiday Rambler

 

Some owners

Alexander Lae

Drew and Alicia Keller drewkeller2010@hotmail.com 1968 HR 27′ trailer

Kay Newman 1972 HR 31′ Holiday Rambler Trailer

Vintage Holiday Rambler Owners Facebook group, all welcomed: https://www.facebook.com/groups/70sholidayramblers/

Holiday Rambler Club: http://www.hrrvc.org/

Shasta

Shasta Travel Trailer

History

The Shasta Trailer Company started out in 1941 by building mobile home trailers for the US Armed Forces in a Los Angeles, California plant. After WWII, they sold mobile homes under the Cozy Cruiser brand. 1952 was the first year for the Shasta brand to roll off the assembly line in Van Nuys. Models from 14′ to 35′ were offered. The boom in mobile homes and travel trailers was in full swing and the public couldn’t get enough of the Shasta brand. In April of 1958, Shasta opened the Goshen, Indiana plant to keep up with demand.

The distinctive wings were added to the Shasta line in the late 50’s and continued on the trailers and even some motorhomes until the early 80’s. During this time, the Shasta brand was the best selling trailer brand in the US. That is why, after all this time, “Vintage” Shastas are still so popular and available everywhere.

By early 1963, Shasta had added another production plant in Leola, Pennsylvania and was up to 5 different models of trailer. Later in that same year, the all-new model 1500 was offered to 5-star reviews. Again proving to the public, that the value that was built into the Shasta brand was well worth the low price!

In 1964 came the first of the “square-ish” Shastas with the introduction of the redesigned Compat model. It’s leaner, cleaner lines were a sign of things to come and was very well received by the general public. By late 1966, all of the Shasta trailers would be designed with the more modern look. Production plants were also added in Grapevine, Texas and Battle Ground, Washington.

During 1969, the brand new Loflyte was being offered and was a big hit with the RVing public. A sixth plant was added in Columbia, South Carolina as the Shastas were in great demand. And by 1973 there were nearly 500 Shasta dealers throughout the U.S. offering all new models with stylish interiors and all-new exterior styling with bold striping along the sides. The wings were smaller than before, but they were still there!

At some point in time, Shasta trailers were produced by Shasta Industries, a division of the W.R. Grace Company (this information obtained from a 1975 model year owners manual).

Coachman Industries bought the Shasta brand in 1976. They continued making Shasta trailers and motorhomes until as recently as 2004. At one time during the early 1980’s, the Shasta name was on nearly every conceivable type of RV…Motorhomes, 5th-wheels, travel trailers, and even some pop-up campers.

The Shasta brand seems to have disappeared with no goodbye and no fanfare. Not really a fitting end to such an amazing part of American history. Until it’s disappearance, Shasta had been the longest continuous producer of trailers in the United States.

In the summer of 2000, Shasta cut their model lines down significantly. When I asked why, the staff at the plant in Middlebury, IN said Coachman was looking to reduce the number of models/lines offered. Coachman was bought out by River Forest. In 2009 Forest River made the Shasta Airflyte 12′ with a great retro look for one year but discontnued it because it would compete with their small lightweight trailer called the R Pod.

As of late 2010, Shasta is once again producing Travel Trailers and Fifth wheels.The company is a stand alone division of Forest River, and offer Oasis, Revere and Flyte travel trailers and Phoenix fifth wheelsfor the 2013/2014 model years.

We are restoring a 1955 Shasta trailer but I cant’find any that look like ours. It is all alumimum with only one window on the sides that open top & bottom. It has a full stove with 4 burners,ice box on the door side of the trailer. The Shasta also has a heater in it between the stove & sink area. Our trailer has a full bed in back with a hamik on the top a kitchen table in front that folds down to a bed.

If you know anyone that has a 55 Shasta like ours would you send them our e-mail address redcreek@fidalgo.net. Thanks you

Shasta travel trailers were recreational vehicles originally built between 1941 and 2004. Founded by industry pioneer Robert Gray, the firm was originally situated in a small factory in Los Angeles, California to provide housing for members of the US Armed Forces. With the growth in sales over the following 30 years, the “home” factory in L.A. moved to three steadily larger facilities in Southern California, in addition to six other factories established across the country to better serve the regional markets. At the time of its purchase by the W.R. Grace Company in 1972, Shasta was the largest seller of recreational vehicles in the United States (also including motorhomes in its inventory). Coachmen Industries, Inc. bought the firm from Grace in 1976.

The high quality and low price of Shastas made them a favorite with campers all over the United States.

Shasta Loflyte trailer, built in 1971, currently located at Lost Valley Educational Center

Same Shasta Loflyte Trailer in the Snow in March

The “wings” on the rear sides were a visible identifier in the 1960s and beyond. The name was sold to Coachmen Industries. Coachmen marketed Shasta branded travel trailers until 2004. Only vintage trailers were available until 2008 when the brand was reintroduced complete with its identifying wings. The new trailers have updated art deco interiors and are all electric. Their features include stainless steel microwaves, stainless steel sinks and mini blinds, hot plate cooktops, wet baths and entertainment features – including a 19″ LCD television.

In 2010, Shasta RV re-emerged as a division of Forest River Inc. In March 2012, Mark Lucas became the president and general manager of Shasta RV. The company has grown to include a sales office, multiple production facilities and a finished goods staging area.

In 2015, Lucas introduced the 1961 Airflyte re-issue with production limited to 1,941 units, honoring the company’s first year in business. Re-issues were available in 16-foot and 19-foot floorplans and in three two-tone colors: Matador Red, Seafoam Green and Butternut Yellow, all with Polo White. These models included the signature “Z” stripe and the iconic wings. However, Shasta ended up recalling 1,736 of the re-issued Trailers for window and tire issues.[1] [2]

Shasta RV currently builds the Oasis, Revere and Flyte lines of travel trailers and the Phoenix line of fifth wheel travel trailers.

Vintage Shasta Trailer VIN Numbers


Beautifully restored vintage Shasta trailer with iconic wings, from the 1960's

If you’re checking out a vintage trailer for sale, you need to thoroughly inspect it and ask the seller a lot of questions. One of the most important details you need to confirm is that the seller has a “title” document (sometimes called a “Pink Slip”), verifying that he/she owns the trailer. In addition, you need to make sure that the VIN (i.e., “Vehicle Identification Number”) printed on the title document, matches the VIN number attached to the trailer.

On vintage Shasta trailers the factory stamped a unique VIN numberPhoto shows the location of the VIN number stamped into an original vintage Shasta trailer frameon each trailer’s frame, near the tongue. You should be able to find the VIN number stamped into the curb-side (i.e., “door side”) leg of the tongue frame, on the outside face (see the red outlined area in the photo at the right). You should also find a small VIN plate welded to the inside face of the street-side leg of the tongue frame (the green outlined area in the photo at the right). If this is an un-restored trailer, these numbers on the frame may be obscured by rust, dirt and peeling paint. You may need to get up-close and use a flashlight to make out the digits. If the seller will let you, try lightly sanding the area to remove some of the built-up gunk, and expose the numbers. If you can’t find any numbers, or the numbers have been altered (filled-in, filed-off, scratched off, etc.), or the numbers don’t match the VIN number printed on the title you should probably walk away. Getting the State to help you sort out the descrepancy will most likely be a difficult and hair-pulling experience. Worst case; this trailer is stolen and the “seller” doesn’t really own it. Just walk away.

The VIN number printed on the title document may match just the digits on the welded-on plate, or it may match the longer number stamped into the curb-side of the frame. Regardless of which way the trailer was originally titled, make sure the VIN number printed on the title matches one of the numbers on the trailer’s tongue frame.

Photo of the welded-on VIN number plate installed by the factory on a vintage Shasta trailer frame
Technically, the number on the small welded-on plate (click on the photo at the left) contains the actual VIN number assigned by the Shasta factory. There doesn’t appear to be a consistent scheme used by all of the Shasta factories thru-out the production years, for assigning these VIN numbers. Each number is unique, but don’t expect to be able to determine the trailer’s month or year of manufacture, based on the VIN number.

The number stamped on the curb-side of the frame Photo shows the location of the VIN number stamped into the side of a vintage Shasta trailer frame by the factorywill usually be longer, incorporating the number from the welded-on plate plus some other letters and numbers (click on the photo at the right). Generally, Shasta used the letter codes to indicate which factory location built the trailer, but de-coding the meaning of these letters tends to be an inexact science. Some trailerites believe that the extra numbers stamped onto the curb-side of the frame may indicate the trailer’s production sequence number (it is believed that during the 60’s, the Northridge plant stamped a ‘PA’ after the VIN and followed this ‘PA’ with a sequence number, as shown in the photo) within that manufacturing plant – possibly indicating the year the trailer was built, but again that is just conjecture.

Here is a partial list of the the “Shasta Plant” letter codes you may find included in the string of characters stamped into the frame:
‘C’ –   Built at Shasta’s Van Nuys, California plant
‘CA’ – Built at Shasta’s Van Nuys, California plant
‘DS’ – Built at Shasta’s Northridge, California plant
‘ES’ – Built at Shasta’s Northridge, California plant
‘FS’ – Built at Shasta’s Northridge, California plant
‘GS’ – Built at Shasta’s Northridge, California plant
‘HS’ – Built at Shasta’s Northridge, California plant
‘P’ –    Built at Shasta’s Leola, Pennsylvania plant
‘S’ –    Built at Shasta’s Columbia, South Carolina plant
‘T’ –    Built at Shasta’s Grapevine, Texas plant
‘V’ –    Built at Shasta’s Goshen, Indiana plant

What Year is My Vintage Shasta Trailer?


Beautifully restored vintage Shasta trailer with iconic wings, from the 1960's
Trying to figure out what year your vintage Shasta trailer was built, will often involve some research and sleuthing. Original production unit counts from the Shasta factory have been lost to time, and finding original dealer brochures and pamphlets can be very difficult. In addition, registering a travel trailer back in the 1950’s and 1960’s was often a casual exercise and it wasn’t uncommon for a new trailer to be licensed by the state with the wrong year on the registration document. Adding to an already murky situation, trailer owners often lost track of the

registration paperwork for “that old trailer sitting behind the barn”. You would think that with the large number of trailers produced by Shasta and still in existence today, that tracking down your vintage Shasta trailer’s birth date would be a fairly simple task. Unfortunately, it’s usually not.

So to make your quest a little easier, here’s a chronological list of Shasta trailer features and design changes over the years:

 The Shasta company has been building trailers since 1942, producing their “Cozy Cruiser” trailer models through model year 1951. The company began building “Shasta” brand trailers in model year 1952.

 For model years 1952 through 1957, Shasta trailers didn’t change Photo shows a restored 1956 Shasta 1400 trailer with no wings on the sidemuch. During this era Shastas had no “wings”, but with a rounded profile front and back, no rear bumper, 3 separate window frames across the front, a wooden screen door and wonderful honey gold shellacked birch interior woodwork, these early Shastas are the epitome of the classic “canned ham” trailer. Shasta trailers were available in several different lengths but the overall shape and design features were very similar across the model range.

 Shasta introduced big changes starting with model year 1958. Picture of a restored 1960 Shasta trailer showing the new front profile introduced in model year 1958The most noticable change was in the front profile which now leaned forward at the top as it curved up into the roof, instead of the simple rounded front end on the 1952 – 1957 Shasta models. The other big change starting in 1958 was the pair of unique shiny ribbed “wings” that now adorned both sides of the trailer at the rear, jutting boldly backwards to evoke a whimsical feeling of “winged flight”. These wonderful wings were unique to the Shasta trailer and when you see a vintage trailer with wings today, you immediately recognize it as a Shasta. If your vintage Shasta trailer has the “upper leaning forward” front end but no wings, the wings may have been there originally but were removed by a previous owner at some point in the trailer’s life. Look for tell-tale screw holes in the siding at the upper back of the trailer, as a clue that your Shasta had wings when it left the factory and is therefore a post 1957 model. The 1958 models also now came with a heavy-duty u-channel bumper across the back of the trailer, that was welded solidly to the trailer’s frame. Shasta model years 1958-1960 generally share all of these attributes.

 More changes came along in 1961. Shasta trailers Photo of a vintage 1964 Shasta trailer showing new metal screen door and front profile first introduced in 1958now came with a light weight aluminum screen door instead of the classic old wooden screen door. For the interior, the old-fashioned radiased (rounded) corners on the cabinets were replaced with a modern right-angle corner. In addition, Shasta was now building some trailers with interior woodwork finished with a “modern” slightly milky finish instead of the traditional but more labor-intensive “golden amber” shellacked finish from previous years. The iconic “Shasta Wings” were still affixed to every Shasta, but now instead of the old wood-core “wrap-around” wings that stepped over the trailer’s side gutter molding, the gutter molding was notched to fit the new “flat” wings which now had an aluminum core and were attached to the side of the trailer using rubber spacers so the wing sat off the siding by about 1/2″.

 For model year 1965, Shasta introduced big changes again. The rounded front and rear exterior profiles were flattened quite a bit for a more modern “squared-off” design. But even with this new design direction, the beloved “Shasta wings” remained, and still appeared on the sides of Shasta trailers into the mid 80’s.

 These design changes may help you get close to determining your Shasta’s birth date, but wouldn’t it be great if the factory stamped the year-of-manufacture on your trailer? Fortunately, on some Shastas the factory left some tantalizing clues that could tell you exactly the year your Interior view of a vintage 1961 Shasta trailer showing the kitchen countertop and original sink, which may include the manufacture dateShasta was built. The first place to look is on the outside of the sink. Open the cabinet doors below the sink and closely examine the side of the sink and you may get lucky and find the manufacture date stamped there by the factory. Another place to check is behind the mirror attached to the hallway cabinet door. Carefully remove the screws that attach the mirror to the door and look for a date stamped on the door behind the mirror, or on the backside of the mirror itself.

Vintage Shasta Trailer Specifications, Weights and Dimensions

One of the most popular lines of trailers is the Shasta. Since the 1940’s, Shasta trailers have been very popular for their low cost, light weight and large amount of room compared to their compact size.  Easily recognized by its distinctive wings and “canned-ham” shape, the Shasta trailer was the best selling travel trailer brand from the 1950’s to the 1980’s. Shasta trailers quickly became a favorite of campers all over the United States due to their low price and high quality and old models are still very popular among vintage trailer restorers and collectors today.

Shasta trailers were manufactured from 1941 until 2004, then again since 2010.

Shasta’s many models offer a variety of interiors, exteriors, and degrees of self-containment which enables you to choose the model which best meets your tastes and needs.  With the table below, compare each vintage Shasta trailer model to help find the right one for you.

Vintage Shasta Trailer Models

Symbols: S=Standard Equipment, O=Optional Equipment, a=Optional Fold-out Double Bed, i=Ice, GE=Gas-Electric Refrigerator, b=Gas-Electric Refrigerator Optional, c=Double Bowl Sink, d=Pressurized Water System, e=Optional Portable Chemical Toilet, F=8 sq. ft. LP Gas-Electric Refrigerator Standard, g=30 lb Gas Cylinders, H=4 Burner Cook Stove Standard, L=4 Wheel Brakes Standard, r=Rating

Years built

1941 through 2004.

Models

Early 60s models:

+++++

1966 Shasta model 1500 – This is a very typical mid-60’s style of Shasta. Beginning in the mid-60’s the older rounded style of the 50’s was replaced with the more angular style as shown here. This unit had a grooved wood paneling, which replaced the birch ply interiors of the earlier years.

+++++

Later Models (Late 60s – Early 70s)

69 1400 rear

69 1400 kitchen

1969 Shasta Stratoflyte 20ft

Some owners

Annie Croissant, Oregon. 1964 Shasta Continental. In most internet sites it states that the Continental model was made in 1965 but my title states the year as 1964.

Connie, Imperial Beach, CA Year:1969 Model:1400. Don’t know what number owner I am but it’s in pretty good condition. I’m sure it can use some restoration instead of just decoration, but since nothing major is visible, I’m playing first!

Kevin Davis, NC 1974 Compact 13′ 1966 17′ SC

Donna Friar, Newaygo, Michigan 1963 Shasta 12′. My husband surprised me with this on Christmas morning several years ago. oldlikeme@sbcglobal.net

Scott & Lauren Frymoyer 1969 Shasta Astroflyte. I haven’t been able to find any information about this model in 1969, any help would be appreciated. It’s in pretty good shape and we’re using it as we try to fix and maintain her. l.frymoyer@comcast.net. With new information I now think it’s actually either a 66 or 67. It makes more sense as the general shape of the trailer fits those years.

Dan Hellier Raleigh NC. 16SC and 1400 , unsure exactly what years. Please check out NC RV Soutions at ncrvsolutions.com There is a picture link at the bottom of the web page.

Dave and Debby Looney, Springtown,TX 1971 Shasta Stratoflite We were lucky enough to get the title with the camper. We are doing a complete rebuild. We hope to go back with the walls tomorrow 10-21-07

Gary,Honesdale,PA 1959 AERFLYTE purchased new in 59 by my moms brother James Bryant and was kept in mint condition.I have had it two years and have towed it cross country two times. Gets lots of attention every where we go.I also have a mint 1960 15 ft. Zollinger.

Sam and Michelle Ishihara, Apex, NC, purchased Dan Hellier’s fully restored, 1969 Shasta 1400, in the summer of 2007. We affectionately dubbed it “Once in a Blue Moon” and we are having a blast. With 3 college kids at home, we run away every chance we get. We can’t stop smiling….:) Dan did a fantastic restoration!

Dave & Pat from Little River, SC, a 1975 RL 1750 manufactured in Leola, PA.

Ryan & Linda frizzell,Toledo, oh., Purchased new 2009 12′ shasta airflight while on vacation this year. downsized from 25′ white box. We also restore vintage trailers, curent project is a 1967 aristocrat 10’Lil Loafer.

Brad & Tricia Kiekintveld Holland, MI USA, purchased 2001 Shasta Ultraflight new in August, 2000. One of 6 units made in June, 2000 at Middlebury, IN. The ultraflight series lasted only one year, the 2001 model year our trailer was made is not documented. We were told the other 5 trailers went out west to a trailer show. We bought our trailer sight unseen, we were getting ready to order one, but the line was cancelled. To my knowledge, our model (2547 – front dinette, double bed bunks, both bunk beds are double beds) was the only 2001 Shasta trailers built in the Ultraflight series. The trailers had smooth sides, very light weight (3200lbs dry for my 25′ trailer) – Our trailer has the 60th anniversary package on it. To bad the production was stopped around 2004, up until then it was the longest manufacturered travel trailer in this country. I will look for the sales brochure and post it on this site.

Carole Rietman, West Olive, Mich [just a stone’s throw or so above Holland] bought a vintage in quite good shape – 1961 Shasta ?Aeroflyte from Jane in June of this year. It’s now in wonderful shape after a LOT of scrubbing, just needs a little TLC with some minor wood damage inside. Looking to replace the “wings” which did not come with it, unfortunately. FIRST time out camping in it today:-), July 19,2010. Has the registration paperwork and two full tanks of propane even.

Karen & Phil Henderson, South Carolina, 1971 Shasta Stratoflyte, 18′. It has a bathroom and a kitchen and even a closet! We have had to gut it though because a previous owner took the cover off of the vent over the propane refrigerator and it had severe water damage from sitting out in the weather for many years. She is in a covered garage now, so the renovations have begun. We have none of the original paperwork, but from the stickers on the side she was manufactured in Pennsylvania. The stove and oven work, but the refrigerator and water heater are dead. Going with an electric frig and a tankless water heater. Also looking into putting solar panels on her roof and a battery system just in case we decide to go off grid.

Bob and Phyllis in Irmo SC have a 1973 model 1400 and a 1956 model 1500. They can be seen at:http://thisoldcamper.com/

2015 Shasta Airflyte 16 Reissue Vintage Travel Trailer

A highly popular and sought-after Vintage travel trailer we are reposting for your perusal. Shasta’s Airflyte is still very popular in searches and (hopeful) purchases. Their reissue included lots of current updates that are, 3 years later, still very useful and current enough for most of our current technology as well. Enjoy the original overview and video walk-through at the end by Shasta’s owner.

MSRP: Starting at $15,000 USD (from 2015)

Length: 16’4″

2015-shasta-airflyte-16-reissue-travel-trailer-exterior

For 2015, Shasta has created a nearly exact replica of it’s iconic 1961 Shasta Airflyte 16SC Travel Trailer complete with the legendary Shasta wings! Shasta started in 1941 and to commemorate their 75th anniversary they are producing a limited construction of 1,941 trailers and will be available in all three original colors; Matador Red, Seafoam Green, and Butternut Yellow.

2015-shasta-airflyte-16-reissue-travel-trailer-interior

Shasta has paid close attention to duplicate every small detail down to the original Shasta logo magazine rack. The new Shasta Airflytes will also feature an all-in-one bathroom with a toilet and shower in place of the closet to meet the desires of today’s campers.

2015-shasta-airflyte-16-reissue-travel-trailer-interior-front

The Airflyte “canned ham trailer” has a vintage interior that remains close to the original, but with all modern appliances and plumbing. Some tweaks have been made though: for example, instead of a twin-size bed, the reproduction accommodates more people by allowing for a full bed. A bunk bed option is also available. This will feature the same full bed/dinette and bunks.

2015-shasta-airflyte-16-reissue-travel-trailer-kitchen

It comes with a dog-bone pattern Formica on the counter tops, and birch cabinet doors, as well as LED lighting. Tuck-and-roll pleather matching the exterior color, that looks old, is on the bench seating in the dining area. The floor is also made of black-and-white vinyl.

2015-shasta-airflyte-16-reissue-travel-trailer-bed

This new travel trailer boasts tons of storage throughout with sleek finishes! The Shasta weights roughly 2,270 pounds, making it easily tow-able behind most SUVs, sedans, and mini vans. So, enjoy the finer things in life with this 2015 Shasta AirFlyte 16.

2015-shasta-airflyte-16-reissue-travel-trailer-bathroom

Interior Features:

  • Concealed Radio Controls w/ Aux Input
  • Hidden Bluetooth stereo
  • Dinette w/ two tone, tuck-and-roll pleather wi silver welt
  • Dinette makes 54″ x 76″ front bed
  • Rear bench makes 39” x 56″ bed
  • “Dogbone” pattern Formica counter tops trimmed with aluminum edging
  • Bathroom with toilet and shower where the original closet would be
  • Birch wood cabinet doors and other interior features
  • “Scalloped” cabinet doors with retro “Chevron” handles
  • Shasta Logo Magazine Rack
  • Black and White checkerboard vinyl flooring
  • Interior color scheme to match exterior
  • All Interior Lights are LED
  • Original Gas Lamp reproduced to look like 1961 gas lamp is LED
  • Throwback Hehr Jalouise Windows
  • Draperies
  • 3 Burner Cooktop
  • 3 Way ReferSS Micro Oven
  • 3-Wat Refrigerator with Freezer

2015-shasta-airflyte-16-reissue-travel-trailer-exteriorr

Exterior Features:

  • Hidden flip-down stabilizer jacks
  • Hidden outside speakers
  • LED exterior lights made like ’61 retro style
  • 24″ wide entry door (original 22″)
  • Friction hinge door
  • LED Lighted Door Handle
  • Hidden air condition
  • Jalousie windows true to original (except back
  • Same 3 Original Colors fire escape window)
  • Wings are to Exact Original Dimensions
  • Same 3 Original Colors to choose from:
    Seafoam Green
    Buttercup Yellow
    Matador Red (color from GM in 1961)
  • Wide Sidewall Radial Tires
  • Rope and Pole Awning
  • 30 AMP Service
  • Original Log Style Aluminum Sliding

SPECS for 2015 Shasta Airflyte 16 Reissue Travel Trailer:

Measurements
Exterior Length16′ 3.75″
Exterior Width7′ 0″
Exterior Height96″
Interior Height (with A/C)6′ 4″
Gross Vehicle Weight Rating (lbs)2,470
Tank Capacities
Fresh Water Capacity (gals) 25
Gray Waste Water Capacity (gals) 18
Black Waste Water Capacity (gals) 11
Water Heater (gals) Gas/Electric 6
A/C (BTU) 5,000

 

2015-shasta-airflyte-16-reissue-travel-trailer-floorplan

1961 Shasta Airflyte Reissued in 2015 Club https://www.facebook.com/groups/1961ShastaAirflyteReissuedin2015

The Vintage Shasta Trailer Forum: http://vintageshasta.proboards.com/

Vintage Shasta specifications

http://autos.groups.yahoo.com/group/Classicshastas/ Classic Shasta Trailer Discussion group. Get your manuals, ads, etc., here.

http://autos.groups.yahoo.com/group/VintageShastaClub/ VintageShastaClub on Yahoo

http://www.freewebs.com/kc8jwa/classicshastas.htm Shasta History, Wings and Paint information, etc.

http://www.freewebs.com/kc8jwa/shastacompact.htm Shasta Compact site

http://www.shastaloflyte.com Shasta LoFlyte Dedicated Info Repository

NC RV Solutions – Shasta restoration project

http://www.engine-decals.com For vintage style Shasta decals, has many colors to choose from.

Videos

Vintage Shasta Trailer Pictures

Of the hundreds of different brands of “canned ham” style travel trailers manufactured during the 40’s, 50’s and 60’s, the classic Shasta Trailer is certainly one of the best known. The polished “Shasta Wings” jutting off the rear are widely recognized, and are usually the first feature that comes to mind when someone mentions that their family had a Shasta Trailer. This well known company was established in 1942 and these rounded beauties were built on Keswick Ave in Van Nuys California then later Northridge California, with another facility in Goshen Indiana. The predecessor to the Shasta, the “Cozy Cruiser”, began rolling out of the factory in 1951, with the classic “canned ham” shape. Early Shastas retained this rounded side profile through model year 1957. The beloved “Shasta Wings” first appeared on the 1958 models, when the original rounded canned-ham shape was altered with the top frontal area now leaning slightly forward and then angling back inwards toward the bottom. The popular Shasta trailer came with warm natural wood interior paneling and cabinets of Birch or Ash. The kitchen counter and dining table were covered with color-coordinated laminate which was also used for the simple sliding doors on the wood cabinets over the dining table. The single 110v ac outlet was barely adequate but the butane powered wall lamps cast a warm and cozy light against the golden hue of the interior woodwork (see some great Shasta Interiors here). The classic Shasta canned-ham shape was changed to a more squared-off style, front and back, beginning with the 1965 models, but the much-loved Shasta Wings continued intact into the mid 1980’s. Whether it’s the Cozy Cruiser model from the early 1950’s, or the Compact, 16-SC, 16-SCS, 16-RK, Astrodome, Starflyte, Airflyte, 1400, 1500, 1900 or more modern Loflyte and Stratoflyte models, Shasta travel trailers remain one of the most popular family trailers on the road today.
Click Image to Enlarge it
Freshly Restored 1956 Shasta Travel Trailer
1956 Shasta Trailer, Mint Green and White
1956 Shasta Canned-Ham Trailer
1956 Shasta Trailer, Great Paint With Silver Stripe
Classic 1956 Shasta Trailer, Ready For Camping
1956 Shasta Trailer, Freshly Restored
Beautiful 1956 Shasta Travel Trailer
1956 Shasta Trailer, Ready For Camping
Custom Flowers Mural Hand-Painted on a 1954 Vintage Shasta Trailer
1956 Shasta Trailer, Custom Painted Propane Tanks
1959 Shasta Trailer Compact Model
1959 Shasta Trailer, Compact Model With Wings
Vintage 1959 Shasta Trailer, 2 tone Blue and White Paint
1959 Shasta Compact Trailer, With Front Jalousie Window
Popular 1959 Shasta Compact Trailer Travel Trailer
1959 Shasta Compact Trailer, Very Clean Restoration
1954 Shasta 1400 Trailer in original yellow and white paint scheme
1954 Shasta 1400 Trailer, painted yellow and white
Early 1954 Shasta 1400 Trailer, one of the first Shastas after the Cozy Cruiser models
1954 Shasta 1400 Trailer, first “Shasta” year
Rare 1954 Shasta 1400 Trailer in mostly unrestored original condition
1954 Shasta 1400 Trailer, rare canned ham
Picture of a 1954 Shasta 1400 vintage Travel Trailer, showing child's cot over the fold-out bed
1954 Shasta 1400 Trailer, child’s cot over bed
Rare all wood vintage dining table in a 1954 Shasta 1400 Travel Trailer
1954 Shasta 1400 Trailer, original dining table
Early 1954 Shasta 1400 Travel Trailer with original gas stove and birch kitchen cabinets
1954 Shasta 1400 Trailer, vintage gas stove
Original 120v light fixture and stitched lamp shade in a vintage 1954 Shasta 1400 Travel Trailer
1954 Shasta 1400 Trailer, vintage 120v light fixture
Shellac finish and vintage cabinet latch on original birch kitchen cabinets in a 1954 Shasta 1400 Travel Trailer
1954 Shasta 1400 Trailer, birch door & original latch
Photo shows original chrome cabinet hinges on a kitchen cabinet door in a 1954 Shasta 1400 Travel Trailer
1954 Shasta 1400 Trailer, birch door & original hinges
Photo of rare original heat in ceiling of 1954 Shasta 1400 Trailer, over the original propane wall lamp
1954 Shasta 1400 Trailer, orig gas lamp heat shield
Sharp 1956 Shasta 1400 Trailer painted bright blue and white
1956 Shasta 1400 Trailer, blue and white
Birch wood cabinets and paneling in 1956 Shasta 1400 Travel Trailer
1956 Shasta 1400 Trailer, birch cabinetry
Picture of dining area in 1956 Shasta 1400 Travel Trailer
1956 Shasta 1400 Trailer, dining area
Photo shows bedroom and ceiling hammock in 1956 Shasta 1400 Travel Trailer
1956 Shasta 1400 Trailer, bedroom area with hammock
Birch kitchen cabinets and stovck ceiling lamp fixture in 1956 Shasta 1400 Trailer
1956 Shasta 1400 Trailer, kitchen cabinets
Bright 1956 Shasta 1400 Vintage Trailer ready for camping
1956 Shasta 1400 Trailer, ready for camping
1964 Shasta Trailer being towed by a 1955 Chevy Nomad Station Wagon
1964 Shasta Trailer and 1955 Chevy Nomad Wagon
1964 Shasta Trailer with red and creme white paint color scheme
1964 Shasta Trailer, painted red and creme-white
Vintage 1956 Shasta 1400 Trailer painted Necco wafer orange
1956 Shasta 1400 Trailer, painted Necco wafer orange
Stunning Early Shasta Trailer paint bright yellow and white
Early Shasta Trailer, painted bright yellow & white
Sharp vintage Shasta Travel Trailer painted bright yellow and white
Beautiful yellow and white early Shasta Trailer
Photo of beautifully restored 1961 Shasta Astrodome Trailer
1961 Shasta Astrodome Trailer, beautiful restoration
Vintage 1961 Shasta Astrodome Trailer painted light blue and white colors
1961 Shasta Astrodome trailer, painted light blue & white
Rare 1961 Shasta Astrodome Trailer with Honda 90 Trail bike mounted on rear custom rack
1961 Shasta Astrodome Trailer & Honda-90 Trail Bike
Custom Flowers Mural Hand-Painted on a 1954 Vintage Shasta Trailer
1954 Shasta Trailer, Hand Painted Flowers and Shutters
Early 1955 Shasta Canned-Ham Trailer
1955 Shasta Trailer Camping at Refugio Beach, Calif.
Vintage 1955 Shasta Trailer, with yellow Kitchen Laminate
1955 Shasta Trailer Ice Box and Oven in Kitchen Area
Classic 1955 Shasta Trailer showing original entryway cabinet
1955 Shasta Trailer Original Corner Closet Cabinet
Vintage 1955 Shasta Travel trailer with Cabinet Over Kitchen Counter
1955 Shasta Trailer Kitchen Cupboard
Gas stove & oven unit in 1955 Shasta travel trailer
1955 Shasta Trailer Vintage Princess Gas Oven & Stove
Custom made birch screen door in vintage 1955 Shasta trailer
1955 Shasta Trailer New Wood Screen Door!
Classic Shasta magazine rack still hanging in 1955 Shasta Trailer
1955 Shasta Trailer Dining Area – Original Magazine Rack
Newly painted 1955 Shasta Trailer and restored Dodge Pickup Truck
1955 Shasta Trailer and
Vintage 1960 Dodge Pickup
Beautifully restored Vintage Shasta 1400 travel trailer in pastel orange
1956 Shasta 1400 Trailer
With Awning
Welcoming Dining area in 1956 Shasta model 1400 trailer
1956 Shasta 1400 Trailer
Dining Area
1956 Shasta trailer bedroom area at the end of the kitchen counter
1956 Shasta 1400 Trailer
Bedroom Area
Very sharp 1956 Shasta 14ft trailer at Pismo Beach Trailer Rally
1956 Shasta 1400 Trailer
at Pismo Rally
Blue and White vintage 1956 Shasta canned-ham trailer
1956 Shasta Trailer
painted blue and white
Very sharp 1956 Shasta Travel Trailer with vintage wide whitewall tires
1956 Shasta Trailer
Camping at Pismo
Gaucho bed setup as a couch in a 1960 Shasta Airflyte vintage trailer
1960 Shasta Airflyte
Gaucho bed folded up
Restored 1960 vintage Shasta Airflyte trailer has a beautiful orange and white paint job
1960 Shasta Airflyte
looks great in orange!
Full sized bed in vintage 1956 Shasta travel trailer
1956 Shasta Trailer,
Cozy Bedroom
Very nicely restored red and white 1956 vintage shasta trailer
1956 Shasta Trailer
Beach Camping
Old 1956 Shasta trailer nicely restored in 2 tone red and white paint scheme
1956 Shasta Trailer
at Pismo Rally
Very clean classic 1957 Shasta travel trailer in yellow and white
1957 Shasta Trailer Lemon Yellow With Awning
Great restoration of a classic 1957 Shasta trailer with red and white paint
1957 Shasta Trailer in Red and White
Sharp 1958 Shasta Airflyte vintage canned-ham trailer
1958 Shasta Airflyte Trailer in Blue and White
1958 Shasta Airflyte travel trailer with classic Shasta wings
1958 Shasta Airflyte Trailer With Side Canopy
1961 Shasta travel trailer at Mount Baker Rally in Lynden, Washington
1961 Shasta Trailer at Mt. Baker Trailer Rally
Classic 1962 Shasta 1500 travel trailer
1962 Shasta 1500 Trailer in Turquoise & White
Vintage wood magazines rack mounted in 1962 Shasta model 1500 trailer
1962 Shasta 1500 Trailer Vintage Magazine Rack
1962 Shasta 1500 trailer dining area, new bench seats and curtains
1962 Shasta 1500 Trailer Dining Room Area
Original Gas Lamp Fixture in 1962 Shasta 1500 Vintage Trailer
1962 Shasta 1500 Trailer Vintage Gas Lamp
Cool Art Deco Light fixture in 1962 Shasta trailer kitchen area
1962 Shasta 1500 Trailer Original Art Deco Lamp
Vintage Holday Gas Stove/Oven Unit in 1962 Shasta 1500 trailer
1962 Shasta 1500 Trailer Vintage Holiday Gas Stove
Classic 1962 Shasta Travel Trailer Showing Shasta Logo and Dining Windows
1962 Shasta 1500 Trailer Front View
Beautiful Reproduction of Shasta Logo Decal on 1962 Shasta Travel Trailer
1962 Shasta 1500 Trailer Repro Shasta Decal
Cool Sunbrella Striped Awning on Dining Window of 1962 Shasta Trailer
1962 shasta 1500 Trailer at Pismo Beach
Vintage 1962 Shasta Trailer on party night, with lantern lights and awning
1962 Shasta Trailer at Night – Party Time!
Classic 1962 Shasta Airflyte Travel Trailer With Striped Side and Window Awnings
1962 Shasta Trailer With Window Awning
Vintage 1962 Shasta Travel Trailer Painted Creamy Pastel Yellow
1962 shasta Trailer Pastel Yellow and White
Inviting Dining Table and Seats in Classic 1962 Shasta Trailer
1962 Shasta Trailer Dining Room Area
Rear End Shot of 2-tone Yellow and White 1962 Shasta Trailer Coach
1962 Shasta Trailer Rear Shot, Nice Wings
Striped Bedspread in 1962 Shasta Travel Trailer Restored Bedroom Area
1962 Shasta Trailer Bedroom Area
Original Holiday Propane Oven/Stove in 1962 Vintage Shasta Trailer
1962 Shasta Trailer Kitchen Cabinets & Oven
1962 Shasta Trailer Coach With Retro Chrome Rear Tail-Light Visors!
1962 Shasta Trailer, Very Cool Tail Light Visors
1962 Shasta Trailer With Trademark Aluminum Shasta Wings on Backside
1962 Shasta Trailer wings Close up
Paint Removed From 1962 Vintage Shasta Airflyte Trailer: Huntington BeachCruisers Meet
1962 shasta Trailer Polished, at Huntington Beach, Calif.
Vintage 1963 Shasta 16-SCS Trailer Coach
1963 Shasta 16SCS Trailer Light Blue & White
Unique 1963 Shasta Back-Entry Travel Trailer in Salmon Pink and White
1963 Shasta Back Entry Trailer in Salmon Pink
Kitch Counter Across Rear of Vintage 1963 Shasta Back Entry Trailer
1963 Shasta Back-Entry Trailer Kitchen Area
Sleeping Area Above Dining Table in 1963 Shasta Back Entry Trailer
1963 Shasta BackEntry Trailer, Dining Area With Bed Above
Front Shot of Rare Vintage 1963 Shasta Back Entry Trailer
1963 Shasta Back Entry Trailer, Rare and Beautiful
Fully Restored 1963 Shasta Compact Trailer
1963 Shasta Compact Trailer in Turquoise and White
Turquoise & White 1963 Shasta Compact Trailer With Wonderful Ribbed Wings
1963 Shasta Compact Trailer With Great Wings
Restored Dining Area in Vintage Shasta Travel Trailer
Vintage Shasta Trailer Dining Table With Period Accessories
Sharp 1962 Shasta Trailer, Compact Model
1962 Shasta Compact Trailer, Great Shasta Wings!
1962 Shasta Compact Trailer, Wood Cabinets in Kitchen Area
1962 Shasta Compact Trailer, Oven and Fridge
1962 Shasta Compact Trailer Interior Detail Showing Dining Table
1962 Shasta Compact Trailer, Dining Area
1962 Shasta Compact Trailer, Green and White With Red Polka Dot Awning!
1962 Shasta Trailer, Compact Model in Green and White
Refinished Wood Cabinets in 1962 Shasta Compact Trailer Dining Area
1962 Shasta Compact Trailer, Wood Paneling and Cabinets
Original 1968 Shasta Loflyre Travel Trailer
1968 Shasta Trailer, Loflyte Model With Wings
1968 Shasta Loflyte Trailer in Great Unrestored Condition
1968 Shasta Loflyte Trailer, Large Dining Area
1968 Shasta Loflyte Trailer With Original Whitewashed Cabinets and Woodwork
1968 Shasta Loflyte Trailer, Spacious Kitchen Area
Bright and fresh 1969 Shasta Starflyte Trailer in yellow and white paint scheme
1969 Shasta Starflyte Trailer, painted yellow and white
1969 Shasta Starflyte Travel Trailer with beautiful pink and white decorations in dining area
1969 Shasta Starflyte Trailer, decorated dining area
Photo of stylish decorations and accessories in 1969 Shasta Starflyte Trailer bedroom area
1969 Shasta Starflyte Trailer, stylish sleeping area

Golden Falcon

Golden Falcon

History

Skyline produced a Golden Falcon from the late 60s into the early 70s in Elkhart, Indiana

Glendale also made a Golden Falcon in the 1970s – 1990s

Company History:

Skyline Corporation designs and produces manufactured housing and recreational vehicles (RVs). Approximately 80 percent of the company’s total sales are derived from manufactured homes, which are sold under several different trade names. Skyline makes two basic types of manufactured housing: single-section mobile homes and multi-section homes. Single-section homes, which range from 36 to 80 feet in length and 12 to 18 feet in width, are often located in designated mobile home parks. Because their size makes them easy to move from place to place, they are considered “mobile homes.” Skyline’s multi-section homes, however, are larger and more closely resemble site-built homes. Buyers typically place these homes on traditional lots, and rarely, if ever, move them. Almost 70 percent of the homes produced by Skyline are multi-sections. The company’s recreational vehicle segment manufactures three types of towable RVs–conventional travel trailers, fifth-wheel trailers, and park models, as well as a line of slide-in truck campers. They are sold under the “Nomad,” “Layton,” “Aljo,” and “WeekEnder” trademarks. Skyline operates 25 manufacturing plants in 12 states and distributes its products through a national network of manufactured housing and RV dealers.

1950s: A New Spoke in an Industry Hub

Skyline Coach, the predecessor to Skyline Corporation, was established in 1951 in Elkhart, Indiana. Its founder, Julius Decio, started the business to produce mobile homes, which were commonly called “house trailers” at the time. The business Decio chose was by no means an uncommon one for Elkhart and its surrounding communities. For 20 years, the city–located in northern central Indiana, just a few miles from the Michigan border–had been a major hub for the mobile home industry. The area’s mobile home business had begun in 1933, when a local merchant decided to try replicating a contraption he had seen at the Chicago World’s Fair that looked like a tent on wheels. Setting up shop in Elkhart, he began building “house trailers,” which resembled rudimentary recreational travel trailers. The trailers’ affordability and mobility made them a good option during the Great Depression, when many families traveled across country looking for jobs and a better life.

The success of this first mobile home manufacturer led others to start similar businesses, and gradually the region became a major source of house trailers. During the Dust Bowl of 1937 and 1938, people began using house trailers not just to travel in, but as actual homes. In response, manufacturers modified their products to make them more closely correspond to traditional homes, increasing the size of the units and adding more amenities. By the end of World War II, mobile homes had evolved into something much different from their travel-trailer predecessors. Larger and more elaborate in design, they were no longer meant to be towed, camper-style, across the country by families on the move. Rather, they had become an alternative and more affordable type of house, typically stationed in one place. There were, however, a number of manufacturers still producing the early smaller trailers, primarily for use as recreational vehicles. After the war, these manufacturers essentially split off from the mobile home industry to form the RV industry.

It was into this newly bifurcated industry that Julius Decio entered when he began building house trailers in a friend’s “welding garage.” His early efforts met with success, and the business was profitable from its first year in operation. In 1952, Decio’s 22-year-old son, Art, returned to Elkhart from Chicago, where he had just graduated college. Art quickly took an active role in his father’s business, working as a division manager in the plant and helping to build the fledgling company. In 1956, he became Skyline’s CEO.

The company expanded geographically under Art Decio’s capable leadership, targeting emerging mobile housing markets in retiree states, such as Florida. Another important facet of the new CEO’s administration was a movement toward near-total reliance on third-party suppliers for materials. Whereas many mobile home manufacturers at that time produced some of their own cabinets and building supplies, Art Decio preferred to order virtually everything from outside sources. By having suppliers deliver inventory on a “just in time” basis, Skyline was able to minimize the need for warehouse space, reduce waste, and better control inventory.

1960s: Diversification and Acquisition

Decio kicked off the 1960s by taking Skyline public. At the time of its initial public offering, the company boasted an impressive string of profitable years and no corporate debt. Skyline’s second milestone of 1960 was to diversify its business by opening a travel trailer and RV plant in Elkhart. This reunion of the mobile home and RV industries made sense on several levels for the company. Since the industry split in the early 1950s, both the RV and housing segments had remained well represented in northern Indiana. Dozens of RV manufacturers–and the second- and third-tier suppliers supporting them–had production facilities in the region. In addition, many of the materials required to produce mobile homes corresponded with the materials needed to produce RVs. Therefore, Skyline’s addition of an RV division allowed for certain inventory and cost efficiencies.

Skyline also used the proceeds from its 1960 IPO to expand its mobile home business via acquisition. In 1962, the company acquired Homette Corporation and Layton Homes Corporation. The following year, Skyline bought Buddy Mobile Homes, and in 1966, added Academy Mobile Homes to its growing portfolio. The company also changed its name from Skyline Coach to Skyline Corporation.

Mid-1970s: Market Downturn

During the 1960s and early 1970s, low interest rates and a generally stable economy had combined to keep the manufactured housing business in high gear. According to the Manufactured Housing Institute, the industry hit an all-time high in 1972, reporting shipments of more than half a million units. In 1973 and 1974, however, interest rates began to climb, and housing sales began to plunge. Shipments of manufactured homes declined by 42 percent in 1974 and another 35 percent in 1975. The RV industry, likewise, fell on hard times in the 1970s. The OPEC oil embargo of 1973 and the resulting hike in gas prices put the brakes on recreational driving. This, combined with the rising interest rates, caused RV sales to fall off.

Already contending with bleak market conditions, Skyline and other producers of manufactured housing were confronted with still another hurdle in 1976. Concerned about mobile homes’ safety, Congress enacted legislation that set stricter standards for their construction. Officially changing the product’s name to “manufactured housing,” the government required all mobile homes to meet stringent manufacturing, fire, electricity, and safety codes. The tougher requirements–and the costs associated with compliance–spurred a wave of closings and consolidations in the manufactured housing industry. Despite the odds against it, Skyline managed to remain solvent and successful throughout the industry slump, never once posting an annual loss. In 1978, the company expanded again, purchasing Country Vans Conversion.

1980–98: Market Swings

The market for RVs improved in the early years of the new decade; between 1980 and 1984, the number of vehicles shipped increased by more than 80 percent. The market for manufactured housing was slower to rebound, however, with sales remaining at levels much lower than they were in the early 1970s. Skyline continued to show improved earnings and remained debt-free–but to do so, it had to trim costs and streamline operations. In 1983, the company had 28 operational and six idle manufactured housing plants. Just four years later, cost-cutting measures had reduced that number to 23 operational and two idle plants. Skyline also hedged against further economic downturns by amassing cash reserves. In 1987, one-fourth of the company’s pretax income came from interest.

The 1990s ushered in better interest rates than consumers had seen in more than a decade, and sales of manufactured housing picked up immediately. Although Skyline’s sales also improved, the company was unable to keep pace with its competitors and consequently surrendered part of its market share. Management attributed the market share loss to a lack of capacity in areas where the manufactured housing markets were expanding fastest. In an April 1996 interview with Investor’s Business Daily, Decio cited Georgia and Texas as two such rapid-growth markets, pointing out that Skyline did not have a strong manufacturing presence in either state. “Even though we’re a national company, at certain times we can’t keep up,” he said.

To bolster output and remedy the situation, Skyline initiated an aggressive expansion plan. In 1994, the company upgraded its manufactured housing plant in Sugarcreek, Ohio, and its RV plant in McMinnville, Oregon. The following year, Skyline laid out another $10 million to renovate four more facilities–in Indiana, Pennsylvania, Florida, and Louisiana. In addition to boosting production, the upgrades were designed to allow all facilities to manufacture a wider range of products. The expansion program paid off; between 1992 and 1995, net income improved by more than 50 percent.

In 1997, Skyline’s sales of manufactured housing fell slightly, and the resulting dip in total sales broke the company’s five-year record of modest but steady annual increases. A major reason for the decline was an exceptionally harsh winter, which slowed housing sales in some parts of the United States. Another factor was a general softening in the demand for manufactured housing nationwide, which led many of Skyline’s dealers to reduce their inventories. The company’s RV division had a better year, however. RV sales increased by more than 14 percent over 1996 sales, reversing the previous year’s RV industry slump.

The year 1998 saw a flip-flop in the fortunes of Skyline’s two business segments. The market for manufactured housing improved in the second half of the year, driving up Skyline’s housing sales. In addition to the overall market improvement, the housing segment benefited from a stronger demand for multi-section homes, which commanded higher prices than single-section homes. On the other hand, Skyline’s recreational vehicle sales decreased in 1998, despite the fact that, industry wide, demand for the vehicles increased.

1999 and the New Century

Skyline appeared to have both its business segments on track in 1999. The market for manufactured housing remained relatively steady through the first half of the year. More significantly, consumer demand for multi-section homes continued to grow, pushing the company’s housing dollars up despite a slight decrease in actual units sold. As its quality continued to improve, manufactured housing was expected to become an attractive option for a wider range of homeowners.

Skyline’s RV business also appeared to be on the upswing as 1999 progressed, showing gains both in units sold and in sales income. This increase was due in large part to overall favorable economic conditions and increased discretionary income, which allowed consumers to spend more for recreational products and activities.

Since its inception in the 1950s, Skyline had been more of a tortoise than a hare, taking few risks and growing slowly and sure-footedly. As the company prepared to leave the 20th century behind, it showed no signs of altering that approach. Because demand in both of Skyline’s major markets was so closely tied to economic cycles, it was impossible to predict how the company might fare in the future. So long as the general economy remained strong, however, it seemed likely that Skyline would thrive.

Pictures

1971 Golden Falcon

1968 Golden Falcon 17 1/2 foot Low Line Series
1963 Glendale Golden Falcon Length: 18 feet-ft

Silver Eagle

Silver Eagle

Wiki Page author – Randy Carmel – carmel.randall@icloud.com

Manufacturer Information:

Silver Eagle, Division of Vacation Homes Inc.
1711 N. Adams    Elkhart, IN. 46514
In business since 1965, Russ Asgard, Pres.;  Kermit Doty, s.m.;  Andy Dixon, g.m. & p.a.;  Pat Musser, prod. mgr.

Years Built:

1965 to at least 1979

Models:

14 different models and truck campers in 1967
7’ wide:  15’ & w/c 16’5”, and 16’ & w/c 17’5”, and 17’ & w/c 18’5”
7 1/2’ wide:  17’5” & w/c 19’, and 19’ & w/c 20’5”, and 20’5” s/c. Also 20’5”, 22’5”, & 28’.
8’ wide:  32.5’   Special Units:  commercial models.

Standard Features:

Custom raised hand-crafted cabinetry, aerodynamic windbreak front, metal underbelly, 8 ply tires 15” tires, Dexter heavy duty axles, wheels, springs, brakes. 4” frame, fully insulated, Birch interiors, valenced drapes, 5” cushions, full trunk.

Unique features:

“Wind Cheat” front with the claim of:
  1. 30% less sway
  2. 20% better gas mileage
  3. 100% easier pull
  4. years ahead styling

Prices:

in 1967-68:
  • $1388 for 15’
  • $1558 for 16’
  • $1998 for 17’
  • $2128 for 18’5” s/c
  • $2098 for 19’
  • $2328 for 20’5” w/c
  • $2698 for 20’5”
  • $3628 for 28’
  • $3198 for 8’ wide 32’5” trailer
  • See also photo of 1979 dealer price list for later models.

Photos

1969 Silver Eagle Brochure
1967 ad showing “wind cheat” design

By the mid-late 70’s models lacked pointed front.

Mid-70’s model
Mid-70’s model
Mid-70’s model Interior
Mid-70’s model Interior
Example of late 60’s 19’ cabover model
15’ 1968 model
15’ 1968 model with typical birch interior
1966 17’5” Silver Eagle for Sale
1966 Silver Eagle 17’5” model from above
Ad from 1968 shows many of their models

Obtained at the RV museum library file, a dealer price sheet for 1979

Garway

Garway

History

Built in Elkhart, Indiana

Years built

1960 for sure, that’s what mine is. and 1961, that’s what mine is. I have a 1965. I have a 1959. I think the company changed it’s name from Garwood in 1959.

Models

My 1961 is a ten footer.

Pictures

1959 Garway
1959 Garway
Garway 1962 vintage travel trailer
Garway 1962 vintage travel trailer
1960 Garway Camper Classic Campers, Retro Campers, Vintage Campers Trailers, Vintage Caravans,
1960 Garway Camper Classic Campers, Retro Campers, Vintage Campers Trailers, Vintage Caravans,
1961 Garway
1961 Garway
1959 Garwood
1959 Garwood

Garway Facebook Group – https://www.facebook.com/Garwaycampers/

Frolic

Frolic

History

Manufacturer Information

1984

Years built

M-340-F-K

Pictures/Videos

1964 Frolic
1964 Frolic

1965 Frolic Vintage Travel Trailer Camper, I LOVE the upper bunk space in these!!
1965 Frolic Vintage Travel Trailer Camper, I LOVE the upper bunk space in these!!
1969 vintage frolic camper in Detroit
1969 vintage frolic camper in Detroit
The 1970 Frolic travel trailer
The 1970 Frolic travel trailer
1965 Frolic
1965 Frolic
Frolic Logo
Frolic Logo

1966 Frolic

You are all in for a treat! While at the Gilmore Car museum car show this past weekend I took some photos of my friend Beth’s 66 Frolic. She won 2nd place in the People’s choice award. There is no doubt why because as you will see it’s just so darn cute!

Get the drool rags ready! (I’m not joking! You will love this!).

I love her little picket fence and table and chairs set.

I think I’m in aqua heaven! Aren’t those sheer curtains just scrumptious?!

What a sweet kitchen. I love the back splash don’t you?

Um, yes I could definitely take a nap on this bed! Check out the suitcases up on the shelf…she uses those for storage. Beth is one of the most creative ladies I know and I love her decorating skills and sense of style.

I hope you all enjoyed the tour of Beth’s Frolic! I never tire of seeing this trailer and I’m fortunate to have the opportunity to camp with Beth now and then.

Franklin

Franklin

Franklin Coach Co. Nappanee, IN 46550 Ph. 574-773-4106

Founder: Paul Abel

Manufacturer Information

Taken from the company’s website http://www.franklincoachrv.com/

Franklin Coach Co., Inc. is one of the oldest R.V Manufacturers that has the same ownership from its inception till today. Franklin Coach Co., Inc. was founded in 1945 to build what was then called trailers by Paul Abel and a partner and since 1957 has been solely owned by Mr. Paul Abel. That makes Franklin Coach Co., Inc. one of the only R.V. manufactures that has the same continuous ownership for 60 years.

Mr. Paul Abel is one of the real pioneers of the RV industry. He was instrumental in founding an organization to bring standards to the RV industry and that organization today is called the Recreational Vehicle Industry Association (RVIA). He was president of RVIA for many years and was inducted into the Recreational Vehicle RVMH hall of fame in its second year.

While Paul Abel continues to work on design and engineering of Franklin RV’s today the company is run by 2 of his sons, Rick Abel and Steve Abel, who each have more that 30 years of RV manufacturing experience. 2006

Years built

1945-present day

19 ft caravan

Photos

1967 Franklin Trailer
1967 Franklin Trailer
1968 Franklin
1968 Franklin
1968 Vintage Franklin Trailer
1968 Vintage Franklin Trailer
Vintage, Unrestored 1965 Franklin Travel Trailer - 18ft.
Vintage, Unrestored 1965 Franklin Travel Trailer – 18ft.
Vintage 1964 Franklin Camper Trailer
Vintage 1964 Franklin Camper Trailer
1966 Franklin Vintage Camper
1966 Franklin Vintage Camper

Videos

No known clubs.

Fleetwing

Fleetwing

Fleetwing Traveler / Fleetwing Mobile Homes, Inc.

Manufacturer Information

Elmer Weaver, founder of Yellowstone Coach in 1945 in Wakarusa, Indiana, sold that company sometime in the 1940s and moved to Florida to build coaches under the name Fleetwing. He returned to Wakarusa in the late 1950s and began production of the Fleetwing Traveler line, concentrating on trailers ranging from 12 feet to 17 feet long. The Pletcher family bought the company in 1971 and expanded it into a full-line operation. Don Pletcher estimated that during its existence, Fleetwing Travelers produced more than 35,000 camping units.

At some point Coachman purchased the Fleetwing name and remaining materials/equipment after the company was liquidated. Specific information on the Fleetwing company seem to be pretty scarce online.

Years built

Late 1940s – ?

Models

Wren- 12ft, Chickadee- 14ft, Thrush- 16ft, Cardinal- 17ft, Lark- 17ft, Sunbird 19ft

Pictures/Videos

1968 Fleetwing Wren
1968 Fleetwing Wren
My Fleetwing -wren vintage travel trailer “Sweetie” A true petite canned ham Sweet vintage of Mine-Roxie
1967 Fleetwing Wren
1967 Fleetwing Wren

1971 Fleetwing Thrush

1971 Fleetwing Thrush

'69 Fleetwing Travel Trailer
’69 Fleetwing Travel Trailer
1974 Fleetwing Camper Trailer
1974 Fleetwing Camper Trailer

www.cannedhamdecals.com Decals for Fleetwing trailers.

FAN

FAN (Franklin A. Newcomer)

History

FAN Coach Company was founded by Franklin A. Newcomer on May 16, 1954, and chose his initials for the company name. The “factory”, at first, was a barn with side wall jigs in a horse stable and the cabinet shop in a hay mow. It took three weeks to build the first FAN, a 14 ft. model equipped with a 2-burner plate, ice box, 10-gallon water tank, and a pump by the sink.

The next year a 32′ x 60′ quonset hut was built. One year later, in May of 1956, the quonset hut was moved to Wakarusa, Indiana and a larger 3200 square foot plant was also built to meet the increasing demand for FANs.

Since January of 1965, FAN has been in LaGrange, Indiana. The 73,500sq. ft. plant was located on 52 acres. A new 22,000 sq. ft. warehouse and service center was planned, and FAN employed as many as 230 employees, building 28 FANS a day, and well over 30,000 FANs have been built.

At some point, W.R. Grace Chemical Company bought the then solid FAN Coach Company. Proving they had no business in the travel trailer business, they had all but broken the company. Frank and his wife Maxine repurchased FAN Coach for 10 cents on the dollar, and made it profitable enough for Coachmen to purchase it in 1978, although, sadly they closed it four years later in 1982.

Coachmen Industries continued to use the FAN name for some models for a few years afterwards, but by 1985, the FAN name had disappeared.

Sources: Fan Coach Company, Inc, History Document. RV/MH Museum, Elkhart, IN Keith Newcomer (Founder’s son and Company Officer). Document at RV/MH Museum.

Manufacturer Information

Front Row L to R

Ben Randall – Line Foreman Sam Fergerson – Club President Franklin A. Newcomer – President Rollin Schrock – Quality Control Still has the new camper he bought in 1968. Donald Newcomer – Vice President

Back Row L to R

John Blucker – Purchasing Agent Clyde Ferninger – Sales Larry Vardaman – Line Foreman David Miller – Sales Leonard Rapp – Sales Manager Keith Newcomer – Vice President

Years built

1954 – 1980

Models

LEE LINER, STYLE LINER, LUXURY LINER, Crest-Liner, ELWOOD, SUN SEEKER II, Traveler Twinkle HOME LINER, Flyer II , Fantasy

Standard Features

FAN was the first to use the Mor Ride suspension system

Pictures

Vintage 1964 FAN 17 Ft Sunseeker

Some owners

1960 16ft FAN Coach Joel Manley / Robert Fowle Grand Rapids MI

1959 16ft FAN Coach Joel Manley /Robert Fowle Grand Rapids MI

1966 22.5 foot – Dawn & Gary Vandentoorn, Comstock Park, Michigan

1970 22′ FAN Style Liner – Robert & Sheila Martin, Bethlehem, PA.

1963 16′ FAN – BJ Frantz, Woodstock IL

1959 18′ FAN Coach – Paige Bridges, Wills Point, TX

1962 16′ FAN Coach – Brian Canary, Anderson, IN

1966 16′ Fan Sunseeker – Brian Canary, Anderson, IN

1959 16′ FAN coach – J.C., Michigan

1973 14′ Fan Lee Liner – Paul Fahey, Bolton Massachusetts

1970 20′ fan unknown chad sellers, thornville, ohio

1970 18′ FAN Lee Liner – Jon & Kelli Ochs, Upland, Indiana

1960 19′ The Fan – Sheri McIlvene, Kendall, NY

1960 17′ FAN unknown – Sheri McIlvene, Kendall, NY

1963 16′ FAN – David & Jennifer Boyd, Jefferson City, MO

1968 22′ FAN Luxury Liner – Daniel McCaughtry, Powell, WY

1963 13′ FAN Traveler – JD, Eastern Illinois

1963 Fan cabover 18ft Estate Owners Joel Manley & Robert Fowle Grand Rapids MI

1963 FAN Cabover 14ft very small and narrow Owners Joel Manley & Robert Fowle Grand Rapids MI

1965 FAN Trunk Back 18 ft Owners joel manley & Robert Fowle Grand Rapids MI

Easy Travler

Easy Travler

My title read ESTRA and later ESTR

Elkhart, Indiana

1957-1960+?

Models 12, 15

Straight bottom edge, no opening for wheels, small wheels

Pictures

Yellowstone

Yellowstone

Yellowstone logo

Built 1945-1990

Yellowstone’s Slogan – “Good on the go and great when you get there”

In 1945, Elmer Weaver organized the Yellowstone Coach Co. in Wakarusa. The Yellowstone travel trailer was built and sold in Wakarusa Indiana. Yellowstone trailers were well built and the travel trailer of choice for carnival employees.

Manufacturer Information

Yellowstone was one of the very few companies that didn’t venture into the larger type mobile homes. Here is their 1955 23-footer with 1-bedroom with complete bathroom and kitchen.

1955 Yellowstone

Here is the 19′ model that was one of the regular units of 1955. The plan was interesting in that the bathroom was across from the bed in the rear creating a larger living area up front. Attached is the very same (model) trailer but the 1958 model…..hadn’t changed any.